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HUMAN AND ECOLOGICAL RELEVANCE OF BRYOPHYTES

Some bryophytes and lichens are pioneers on bare rock after volcanic eruptions or other geological upheavals and after the retreat of glaciers. They slowly accumulate mineral and organic matter that can then be inhabited or utilized by other organisms. This process, called succession, is discussed in Chapter 25. Mosses, in particular, retain moisture, slowly releasing it into the soil. They reduce flooding and erosion and contribute to humus formation. Some mosses grow only in soils that are rich in calcium; the presence of others indicates higher than usual soil salinity or acidity. When certain mosses are present in a dry area, it is a good indication that running water occurs there some time during the year. A few mosses are occasionally a problem in water reservoirs, where they may plug entrances to pipes. A few bryophytes are reported to be grazed, along with lichens, by foraging mammals in arctic regions, but bryophytes are not generally edible. Some mosses have been used for packing dishes and stuffing furniture, and Native Americans are reported to have used mosses for diapers and under splints when setting broken limbs.

By far, the most important bryophytes to humans are the peat mosses. When allowed to absorb water, 1 kilogram (2.2 pounds) of dry peat moss will take up 25 kilograms (55 pounds) of water. Its extraordinary absorptive capacity has made it very useful as a soil conditioner in nurseries and as a component of potting mixtures. Live shellfish and other organisms are shipped in it. The natural acidity produced inhibits bacterial and fungal growth and gives it antiseptic properties. The absorbency, which is greater than that of cotton, combined with the antiseptic properties, has made it a useful poultice material for application to wounds.

It was used for this purpose during the Crimean War of 1854 to 1856 and, as indicated in the chapter introduction, on an emergency basis during World War I. Extensive peat deposits have been formed from the remains of peat mosses that flourished in past eras. Peat, like the undecomposed peat mosses, is used around the world as a soil conditioner and as a fuel. In the manufacture of Scotch whiskey, sprouted barley is dried on a screen over a peat fire. The peat smoke permeates the barley and imparts a smoky flavor to the beverage. See Appendix 1 for the scientific names of all the bryophytes discussed.

PLAN OF THEME STUDY:

I. Homework

TASK ╣ 1. Using lectures and textbooks, learn basic theoretical issues.

TASK ╣ 2. Learn English and Latin names, herbaria and demonstration table following families:

Division Bryophyta

Class Hepaticopsida:

Marchantia ­olimorpha

Bryopsida (Musci):

Bryidae

Polytrichum commune

Subclass Sphagniidae

Sphagnum fuscum

Division Lycopodiophyta:

Class Licopodiopsida

Lycopodium clavatum

Selaginella selaginelloides

Division Equisetophyta

Class Equisetopsida

Equisetum arvense

Division Polypodiophyta



Class Leptofilipsida

Dryopteris filix-ma§

 


Date: 2016-01-03; view: 665


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