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Super Food For Super Health

 

Not picked, fermented!

Raw cultured vegetables are powerful super food. These super foods include sauerkraut, kimchi, pickles and many others. There is a major difference between the foods eaten today as compared to long ago. Years ago fermented vegetables were used as a way to prevent spoilage in food. They were also used on the voyages of Captain Cook to prevent scurvy with his shipmates. The main difference today, as compared to long ago, is that cultured vegetables, such as pickles and sauerkraut have been pasteurized ,thus in part, destroying the many strains of health promoting bacteria’s and naturally occurring enzymes that help with digestion and a slew of other things. These foods are so powerful that in Asia, where they were experiencing the bird flu, they fed an extract of kimchi, a fermented food, to 13 infected chickens – and a week later 11 of them had started recovering. Many times when I or someone close to me has been sick I have given them a tbsp. or two of cultured vegetables and watched, at the remarkable speed of their recovery.

How To Make Cultured Vegetables

There are three ways to make cultured vegetables. I have my favorite way but would like to give you all the methods so that you can choose which best suits you.

You first must choose the vessel you will want to ferment in. You can use a canning jar with a lid, a crock with a lid, a clamp down jar that has a gasket, or my favorite a jar with an airlock. (See resources) Airlock jars creating a low-oxygen, or, anaerobic environment, in which lactic-acid bacteria thrive in. It creates the best results with less chances of mold, but is not absolutely necessary.

You will then choose to use a culture or make them without one. You can certainly make them without a culture but the good bacteria will stay at a higher level longer if you add a culture. This will also increase your own body’s ability to use and grow these good bacteria’s inside of you. The one I believe does this the best is Caldwell’s veggies starter culture.

· No Culture. You can make culture vegetables by simply chopping or placing vegetables in vessels, then submerging them under water and making sure to cover the vegetables. You must add salt with this method because the vegetables themselves with acidifying bacteria’s create the probiotics that preserve your vegetables. This creates and environment that is safe. The good bacterias dominate and keep out and harmful pathogens. You must leave a two inch room for expansion inside the jar. These will expand and can over flow. Follow directions on how long to leave fermenting on your counter. Than place the vegetables in the fridge, were they will last at least 9 months.

· Kefir whey. If using the whey from kefir make sure this it is fresh kefir whey for the best results. To make kefir whey; http://www.culturedfoodlife.com/easy-whey-kefir-cheese/. Amounts will vary according to how much you make. Chop or place vegetables in vessels, then submerge them under water and make sure to cover the vegetables with water. Then you will add your kefir whey. You must leave a two-inch room for expansion inside the jar. These will expand and can over flow. Follow directions on how long to leave fermenting on your counter. Than place the vegetables in the fridge, were they will last at least 9 months.



Best veggie starter

 

· Caldwell Veggie Starter Packages. This is my favorite method for making culture vegetables. I met the people who made these cultures and the science behind what they did. I was pretty impressed, but it was after I made them and saw the results that convinced me. They told me that levels of good bacteria stay at a higher level longer than any other methods. I witness this myself when after a year and a half I pulled some cultured veggies I had made from the back of my fridge, and they were still bubbly and delicious. Making cultured vegetables with these packages can knock out flu’s and colds twice as fast as the other cultured vegetables I’ve made. I love them and witnessed that when people who come to my class use them they have the most success.

 

Sauerkraut without a culture package:

Shredding veggies

A couple heads of cabbage
2 to 3 tbsp Celtic sea salt (Salt will make your vegetables crunchy, without it they are soft and limp).
Remove outer leaves of cabbage. Shred cabbage into desired length. You can use a food processor or by hand. Pack cabbage into a gallon jug with a clamp down lid. Cover with water. Add salt if you want it crunchy. If you want it softer leave salt out. Leave 2 to 3 inches for kraut to expand. Set in a cool place, out of sunlight for 6 days. It will expanded and bubble. That is the fermentation and lactic acid developing. You can really add any kind of vegetables you want. Check it and push down the vegetables if they come up above the water. When exposed to air the cabbage will mold if left like that for a while. It won’t hurt anything if it happens, just scoop out the vegetables above the water and push the other ones down below the water. After 6 days place in the refrigerator. They will last at least 9 months or longer in your fridge.

Shelley’s cultured veggies

To culture vegetables with a culture package:

Caldwells are my favorite veggie starter cultures.

This recipe yields 2 quarts of cultured vegetables.

Ingredients:

Cabbage or other vegetables you would like to ferment. Such as beets, or carrots then you can also add ginger,daikon, and a cloves of garlic..etc. This can be shredded or chopped.

2 to 3 tbsp Celtic sea salt (Salt will make your vegetables crunchy, without it is soft and limp).

1/2 package Caldwell starter culture. This you will split between both jars. Each package makes 1 gallon of cultured vegetables.

 

· Add Caldwell cultured vegetable starter to half cup of water and 1 tsp of sugar or fruit juice. This will enable the starter to become active. Do not worry about the small amount of sugar. The good bacterias will eat this sugar long before you get do.

In my kitchen

· Place shredded or chopped cabbage culture into a glass jar or canister along with 1/2 cup or shredded hard root vegetables such as beets, carrot, daikon, sweet potatoes etc (optional). Pack down well with your fist. Leave about 2 inches of room on top for expansion. Seal jar with airtight lid and place on your counter until fermented. This will take three to six days. Krauts usually take six days . Other vegetables such as pickles, tomatoes and carrots take three days. A layer of harmless mold may form on the top. Simply scrape this off or it will spoil the flavor of your cultured vegetables. Place your vegetables after they have fermented on the counter into the refrigerator. The fermentation process will continue, but very slowly. Over time they will “age” like wine does becoming softer and even more delicious. Refrigerated, cultured vegetables keep for up to eight months and longer.

Making Cultured Vegetables with Kefir Whey

This recipe yields 2 quarts of cultured vegetables.

Ingredients: Cabbage or other vegetables you would like to ferment. Such as beets, or carrots then you can also add ginger,daikon, and a cloves of garlic..etc. This can be shredded or chopped.

2 to 3 tbsp Celtic sea salt (Salt will make your vegetables crunchy, without it is soft and limp).

1/4 cup of kefir whey for each jar. Total kefir whey is 1/2 of a cup. Here’s how to make kefir whey.

· Add kefir water to jar or vessel. each jar should have 1/4 cup of kefir whey placed in it.

· Place shredded or chopped cabbage culture into a glass jar or canister along with 1/2 cup or shredded hard root vegetables such as beets, carrot, daikon, sweet potatoes etc (optional). Pack down well with your fist. Leave about 2 inches of room on top for expansion. Seal jar with airtight lid and place on your counter until fermented. This will take three to six days. Krauts usually take six days . Other vegetables such as pickles, tomatoes and carrots take three days. A layer of harmless mold may form on the top. Simply scrape this off or it will spoil the flavor of your cultured vegetables. Place your vegetables after they have fermented on the counter into the refrigerator. The fermentation process will continue, but very slowly. Over time they will “age” like wine does becoming softer and even more delicious. Refrigerated, cultured vegetables keep for up to eight months and longer.

 


Date: 2015-01-29; view: 786


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