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V. to negotiate n. negotiation

 

When people negotiate they discuss things (usually political or business) in order to make a deal or agreement.

 

eg. During the 1980s the British and Chinese governments negotiated the future of Hong Kong

 

Q: What kind of people need negotiation skills ?

A: State agents need negotiation skills.

 

Q: What kind of things do staff negotiate with management ?

A: Staff negotiate salaries and better working conditions with management.

 

Q: Have you ever negotiated a deal ?

A: Yes, I have./Yes, I have negotiated a deal.


Q: How many people/companies were involved ?

A: Just two./Two people were involved.

 

Q: What was the result ?

A: I got a better deal.

 

Q: What kind of things are generally the subject of negotiations between countries ?

A: Imports and exports are generally the subject of negotiations between countries.

 

v/n. sacrifice v/n. compromise

 

Both of these words mean losing (or giving up) something in order to achieve a result.

A compromise is usually an agreement between two people on a subject they have different opinions about.

 

eg I wanted to meet at 6 o’clock, she wanted to meet at 8, so we compromised and agreed to meet at 7.

Q: What are some of the sacrifices that your parents made for you ?

A: My parents sacrificed their career for me.


Q: Do you think you could make the same sacrifices for your kids ?

A: I'm not sure but I hope so./Yes, I think I could make the same sacrifices for my kids.

 

Q: Do you think you have to sacrifice things if you are in a serious relationship ?

A: Yes, I do./ Yes, I think you have to sacrifice things if you are in a serious relationship.

 

 


Q: What kind of things ?

A: I think you have to sacrifice some of your free time and independence.

 

Q: Do you have to be willing to compromise when you negotiate ?

A: Yes, I think you have to be willing to compromise when you negotiate.

 

Q: What kind of compromises could you offer if you were negotiating with employees who were on strike ?

A: I think if you were negotiating with employees who were on strike, you could offer them more money but not as much money as they wanted.

 

Q: Do you agree that all relationships are built on compromise ?

A: Yes, I do./Yes, I agree that all relationships are built on compromise.


Q: What kind of compromises ?

A: Compromises with your free time, with your career, financial compromises.

 

Q: Which shops in this city provide a good compromise between quality and price?

A: I think a lot of High Street shops provide a good compromise between quality and price.

 

Q: Do you think they offer the best value for money ?

A: Maybe./Yes, I think they offer the best value for money.

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Unit 4

 

for the sake of someone/something



forsomeone’s/something’s sake

 

If you do something for the sake of someone else, you do it only to help that person, and not because it helps you.

eg I am moving back to my hometown for my parents’ sake.

 

If you do something for the sake of your health/career etc. you do it only for that reason.

 

eg I love living in the countryside, but I have to move to London for the sake of my career.

 

 

Q: Do some married couples only stay together for the sake of their children ?

A: Yes, they do./Yes, some married couples only stay together for the sake of their children.


Q: Do you think they are doing the right thing ?

A: Sometimes, it depends on the situation./Yes, I think they are doing the right thing.

 

Q: Why would someone cut down on their drinking/smoking ?

A: I think someone would cut down on their drinking/smoking for the sake of their health.

 

Q: Do you know anyone who has sacrificed a lot of their time for other people’s sake ?

A: Yes, my mother has sacrificed a lot of her time.

 

Q: Are you learning English for the sake of your career ?

A: No, I'm learning English to meet more people./No, I'm not learning English for the sake of my career.

 

Q: Is there anything you would enjoy studying for its own sake ?

A: Yes, I would enjoy studying pottery for its own sake.

 

adj. in/convenient n. in/convenience

 

If something is convenient it is suitable for people’s needs and doesn’t cause any problems.

 

Eg There is a bus stop outside our house, which is very convenient.

 

Q: Do you find mobile phones more convenient than land lines ?

A: Yes, I definitely find mobile phones more convenient than land lines.

 

Q: Have your friends ever caused you inconvenience ?

A: Yes, often./Yes, my friends have caused me inconvenience.

 

Q: Do you think it’s worth commuting a long way, despite the inconvenience ?

A: Yes, I do think it’s worth commuting a long way.

 

Q: Do you think the convenience of having a car/washing machine is worth the cost ?

A: Yes, I think so./Yes, I think the convenience of having a car/washing machine is worth the cost.

 

 

Q: Where’s the most convenient place to go shopping if …
… you have run out of milk ?

A: I think the most convenient place to go shopping if you've run out of milk is the corner shop.

 

… you need something to wear to a party ?

A: Maybe a department store./I think the most convenient place to go shopping if you need something to wear to a party is a department store.


… you are getting a month’s supply of groceries ?

A: The supermarket./I think the most convenient place to go shopping if you are getting a month’s supply of groceries is the supermarket.

 


Date: 2015-12-24; view: 996


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