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Put each verb in brackets into a suitable verb form.

 

This time last year I (1) (cycle) in the rain along a country road in France with a friend of mine. We (2) (decide) to go on a cycling holiday in Normandy. Neither of us (3) (be) to France before, but we (4) (know) some French from our time at school and we (5) (manage) to brush up on the basics. Now we (6) (wonder) if we (7) (make) the right decision. We (8) (plan) our route carefully in advance, but we (9) (forget) one important thing, the weather. It (10) (rain) solidly since our arrival and that night we (11) (end up) sleeping in the waiting room at a railway station. Then the next morning as we (12) (ride) down a steep hill my bike (13) (skid) on the wet road and I (14) (fall off). I (15) (realise) immediately that I (16) (break) my arm, and after a visit to the local hospital I (17) (catch) the next train to Calais for the ferry home. Unfortunately my parents (18) (not/expect) me home for a fortnight, and (19) (go) away on holiday. So I (20) (spend) a miserable couple of weeks alone, reading 'Teach Yourself French'.   1.
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The condition of Britain in 1917   The government also 21 (need) to ensure that Britain was fed. Under the Defence of the Realm Act it was able to take over land and turn it over to food production. In February 1917 it 22 (set up) the Women's Land Army to recruit women as farm workers. By then, however, the food supply in Britain 23 (became) desperate. German U-boats 24 (sink) one in every four British merchant ships and Britain had only six weeks' supply of wheat left. As food supplies 25 (run) short, so prices 26 (rise). Wages 27 (hardly rise) during the war because people were mostly prepared to sacrifice better pay to support the war effort, but prices were now almost double what they 28 (be) in 1914. Poorer people could not even afford basic supplies such as bread. Shops 29 (close) early each afternoon as they 30 (run our) of goods to sell.   German reactions to the Treaty of Versailles 1919   The overall reaction of Germans was horror and outrage. They certainly 31 (not believe) they 32 (start) the war. They 33 (not even think) they 34 (lose) the war. In 1919 many Germans 35 (not really understand) how bad Germany's military situation 36 (be) at the end of the war in 1918. They believed that the German government 37 (simply agree) to a ceasefire, and that therefore Germany should have been at the Paris Peace Conference to negotiate peace. They were angry that their government was not represented at the talks and that the Allies 38 (force) them to accept a harsh treaty without any choice or even a comment. At first, the new government 39 (refuse) to sign the treaty and at one point it 40 (look) as though war might break out again. However, Ebert, the new German leader, was in an impossible position. Reluctantly, he agreed to accept the terms of the treaty and it was signed on 28 June 1919. 1.
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Future Tenses

Future Simple

  • is normally known as the predictive future, and describes known facts, or what we supposes true.

I'll be late home this evening.

  • is used to make formal announcements of future plans and to present weather forecasts. It is therefore often used in newspapers and on the television and radio:

The new President will move into the White House tomorrow.

Rain will continue throughout the day.

  • can also take the form of an assumption.

That'll be Jim at the door. (This means that I suppose it is Jim.)

  • is also used to express an immediate, spontaneous decision.

I'll take this one.

  • is also used for habits of which the speaker disapproves. (modal meaning)

He will keep opening the window.

  • expresses an offer and a request.

Iíll carry that for you.

Will you open the window?

  • expresses a promise.

Iíll never let you down.

  • expresses refusal. (modal meaning)

They won't give me my ball back!

  • Shall and shan't are forms used in first person singular and piural in formal and deliberate speech.

We shall inform you, upon admission, of the rules of the library

  • Shall is used in requests about further instructions. (modal meaning)

Shall I close the door?

  • Shallis occasionally used to express strong determination about oneself or someone else. (modal meaning)

I shan't let him bully me.

 

Be going to

  • describes intentions or plans and decisions; at the moment of speaking the plans have already been made.

I'm going to wait here until Carol gets back.

  • is also used to describe an event whose cause is present or evident.

Look at that tree! It's going to fall.

  • In many cases, Future Simple as prediction can be replaced by going to, especially in everyday speech. This is not true for other meanings of will. Normally going to cannot be replaced by will without changing the meaning.

Inflation will increase by 1% over the next twelve months.

As I see it, inflation is going to increase by 1% over the next twelve months.

  • Was going to describes events which were supposed to happen, but did not.

I was going to come over and see you, but I left it too late.

 


Date: 2015-12-17; view: 2314


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In each sentence decide whether one, or both, of the alternative verb forms given are appropriate. Write O for one or B for both. | Present Progressive
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