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Unit 6, Lesson 2, Ex. 3b Melissa Hu

: I love music so giving up my iPod was definitely a challenge. I listen to it during car rides, when Iím eating at restaurants, and sometimes when Iím supposed to be sleeping.

The first few days were the worst. I was trying to study at the library when this guy started talking nonstop to one of his friends. I wanted to reach for my iPod so I wouldnít have to listen to him, but I couldnít. So I tried to do my work but finally moved to another table.

This challenge was especially difficult when I was at home. My parents were installing a floor, so they were constantly using the nail gun. The noise was terrible.

After a couple of days, it got easier. I paid more attention to the things around me and was more productive. I noticed a cat in my backyard bushes. I read books like Sybil and Dubliners.

Without my iPod, I started remembering songs that I had forgotten about. I had always skipped one of my former favorite songs, Green Dayís ďJesus of Suburbia,Ē after years of wearing it out.

I realized I spend too much time using my iPod and feel like I need to always have it with me. I am going to try to use my iPod less by not bringing my earphones with me everywhere I go. Hopefully Iíll be more attentive.

B. Alma Sanchez: I decided to do this challenge because I watch a lot of TV. In the summer, the first thing I did after waking up was turn on the TV in the living room. Sometimes it didnít matter what show it was, as long as I could pass time and not be bored. I thought this challenge would help me get more done, but giving up TV for a week was harder than I thought.

On Monday as soon as I woke up I thought about the shows Iíd be missing like I Love Lucy and a Spanish soap opera. I killed time by going on the Internet. In the afternoon, my mom and I went to the supermarket, where there was a TV screen in every corner of the store! ďHow can they do that to me, donít they know Iím not suppose to watch TV!?Ē I turned away immediately but I still felt bad.

On Tuesday, I went to my auntís house next door and before I knew it I was staring at the video game my cousin was playing. Then I went to the bedroom where my other cousin was switching channels and I left immediately. I went home and read 1984, my summer reading. The book was full of suspense and I couldnít put it down. I didnít think about TV at all.

On Wednesday I even saw a TV on the bus that showed news clips, games and ads. I took a book to read on Friday to avoid watching.

On the other days, I could control not watching TV by staying in my bedroom. Instead of watching TV, I cleaned my desk, looked through college brochures and finalized my college list. I felt more productive but I wanted to watch TV with my family because I could hear them laughing.

When the challenged ended, I wanted to keep going because I did more that week than any other week in the summer. But I knew I would eventually cave and want to watch TV. I realized that TV distracted me and that not watching it helped. Now I only watch my favorite shows and skip boring ones.



—. Elliot Kwon: I always knew that I depended way too much on my phone. But I didnít know how much, so I decided to do this challenge to find out.

Every morning since I got a smartphone, Iíve used The Weather Channel to figure out what to wear. On the first morning I had to dress without guidance, but thankfully I was able to predict that the day would be cold and foggy by looking out my window. When was the last time I did that Ö eighth grade?

I also lost track of time. I havenít worn a watch for more than a year, because my phone showed the time. So I was late picking up friends who took the bus for two hours to come from Santa Monica to Palos Verdes. I also was late to my tutoring job. And even worse, I couldnít call people to tell them that I was running late.

Getting places was harder, too. I got lost because I couldnít use the GPS on my phone. My driving, though, got a lot safer because I no longer had my phone in one hand checking directions while driving with the other.

But the number one problem was not having my contact list. I forgot to write down my friendsí and family membersí phone numbers before I started the challenge. It was sad to realize that I couldnít remember my brotherís and my momís cell phone numbers.

In the midst of all the problems, however, I found peace not worrying about missing a text message or an e-mail.

This challenge was a great learning experience. It surprised me how Iíd overlooked even the simplest things like remembering phone numbers. We all should take some time to think about how we can depend less on our cell phones.

Unit 6, Lesson 2, Ex. 3b

A. Melissa Hu: I love music so giving up my iPod was definitely a challenge. I listen to it during car rides, when Iím eating at restaurants, and sometimes when Iím supposed to be sleeping.

The first few days were the worst. I was trying to study at the library when this guy started talking nonstop to one of his friends. I wanted to reach for my iPod so I wouldnít have to listen to him, but I couldnít. So I tried to do my work but finally moved to another table.

This challenge was especially difficult when I was at home. My parents were installing a floor, so they were constantly using the nail gun. The noise was terrible.

After a couple of days, it got easier. I paid more attention to the things around me and was more productive. I noticed a cat in my backyard bushes. I read books like Sybil and Dubliners.

Without my iPod, I started remembering songs that I had forgotten about. I had always skipped one of my former favorite songs, Green Dayís ďJesus of Suburbia,Ē after years of wearing it out.

I realized I spend too much time using my iPod and feel like I need to always have it with me. I am going to try to use my iPod less by not bringing my earphones with me everywhere I go. Hopefully Iíll be more attentive.

B. Alma Sanchez: I decided to do this challenge because I watch a lot of TV. In the summer, the first thing I did after waking up was turn on the TV in the living room. Sometimes it didnít matter what show it was, as long as I could pass time and not be bored. I thought this challenge would help me get more done, but giving up TV for a week was harder than I thought.

On Monday as soon as I woke up I thought about the shows Iíd be missing like I Love Lucy and a Spanish soap opera. I killed time by going on the Internet. In the afternoon, my mom and I went to the supermarket, where there was a TV screen in every corner of the store! ďHow can they do that to me, donít they know Iím not suppose to watch TV!?Ē I turned away immediately but I still felt bad.

On Tuesday, I went to my auntís house next door and before I knew it I was staring at the video game my cousin was playing. Then I went to the bedroom where my other cousin was switching channels and I left immediately. I went home and read 1984, my summer reading. The book was full of suspense and I couldnít put it down. I didnít think about TV at all.

On Wednesday I even saw a TV on the bus that showed news clips, games and ads. I took a book to read on Friday to avoid watching.

On the other days, I could control not watching TV by staying in my bedroom. Instead of watching TV, I cleaned my desk, looked through college brochures and finalized my college list. I felt more productive but I wanted to watch TV with my family because I could hear them laughing.

When the challenged ended, I wanted to keep going because I did more that week than any other week in the summer. But I knew I would eventually cave and want to watch TV. I realized that TV distracted me and that not watching it helped. Now I only watch my favorite shows and skip boring ones.



—. Elliot Kwon: I always knew that I depended way too much on my phone. But I didnít know how much, so I decided to do this challenge to find out.

Every morning since I got a smartphone, Iíve used The Weather Channel to figure out what to wear. On the first morning I had to dress without guidance, but thankfully I was able to predict that the day would be cold and foggy by looking out my window. When was the last time I did that Ö eighth grade?

I also lost track of time. I havenít worn a watch for more than a year, because my phone showed the time. So I was late picking up friends who took the bus for two hours to come from Santa Monica to Palos Verdes. I also was late to my tutoring job. And even worse, I couldnít call people to tell them that I was running late.

Getting places was harder, too. I got lost because I couldnít use the GPS on my phone. My driving, though, got a lot safer because I no longer had my phone in one hand checking directions while driving with the other.

But the number one problem was not having my contact list. I forgot to write down my friendsí and family membersí phone numbers before I started the challenge. It was sad to realize that I couldnít remember my brotherís and my momís cell phone numbers.

In the midst of all the problems, however, I found peace not worrying about missing a text message or an e-mail.

This challenge was a great learning experience. It surprised me how Iíd overlooked even the simplest things like remembering phone numbers. We all should take some time to think about how we can depend less on our cell phones.


Date: 2015-01-29; view: 1191


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