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MASS MEDIA

¹ 1

1. Let’s talk about mass media: TV, newspapers, radio. Which of these does your family like?

Mass Media

Mass media are one of the most characteristic features of modern civilization. People are united into one global community with the help of mass media. People can learn about what is happening in the world very fast using mass media. The mass media include newspapers, magazines, radio and television. The earliest kind of mass media was newspaper. The first newspaper was Roman handwritten newssheet called “Acta Diurna” started in 59 B.C. Magazines appeared in 1700′s. They developed from newspapers and booksellers’ catalogs. Radio and TV appeared only in the 20th century.

TV is the source of valuable information. It brings the world to our living room, where we can see people of other countries; learn their customs, traditions and problems. We can see great events and famous people. The choice of programmes, modern television provides, is really wide: the news, feature films, talk shows, music programmes, documentary films, educational programmes, serials, interviews.

On the other hand, people tend to spend more and more time in front of the box glued to the screen watching their favourite programmes or just switching over from channel to channel with the help of remote control. Recently the public has grown quite concerned about people’s addiction to television and the Internet. Television and the Internet encourage passive enjoyment. They cut us off from the real world. Sometimes there is too much violence and crime on TV and on the Internet. Parents worry about the effect that television has on children. If parents are not careful children get to see programmes which are not suitable for them. That’s why we should be selective in our choice of programmes and the Internet sites. The mass media is not bad unless we make ourselves bad.

Speaking about my personal preferences on TV, I wouldn’t say a lot, as I’m not a TV fan. But some of my peers still watch TV, often tuning into a particular season of TV show or sporting event like football. The members of my family also demonstrate great diversity in their tastes. My mother enjoys watching lifestyle programmes, talk shows, soaps, drama and sitcoms. My father prefers news and sports programmes. Sometimes I watch music programmes.

To tell you the truth, I’m not really interested in any traditional media. Television, radio and newspapers are becoming less and less popular. I don’t read newspapers. Instead I watch the news summarized on the Internet. Sometimes I enjoy reading magazines or cheaper tabloids.

Nevertheless, newspapers are worth buying! My father thinks they are a daily source of news, education and fun that no home should be without. He is sure that every home should have at least 3 different newspapers a day to get a balanced opinion of world events. So my father buys newspapers to do our bit for the local economy. As for tabloids, as my Mum says, sometimes they come up with good stories. Just imagine the political scandals that would go unnoticed without reporters.



2. Is there any means of communication you can’t live without? Why (not)?

I wouldn’t say – I can’t live without any means of communication. To tell you the truth we should have rest from any form of communication. But I can’t imagine my everyday life without the Internet.

The Internet is a great source of information and entertainment for many people. It has made possible new forms of social interaction and has become a major source of leisure.

Thanks to it I have got an opportunity to access news, documents, images, sounds, video and games, to make friends, to book tickets and to purchase different things online. There are a lot of different sites for students, gardeners, businessmen, engineers, for people who are fond of music, cinema, theatre, sports and even for disabled people. What is more, the Internet has revolutionized the way people communicate. Sending electronic text messages is much faster and easier than writing letters. People use e-mail to stay in touch with friends worldwide.

3. What questions will you ask the participants of Dom 2, a TV reality show?

Frankly speaking, I wouldn’t like to talk to them at all. The only question may be:

- What makes you take part in this kind of a TV show?

4. I’d like to watch an interesting programme on TV. What can you advise me?

First of all, I would ask about your preferences and interests. Sometimes people watch TV just to relax. In this case my advice may be very different. So, I personally would recommend you to watch any programmes on Discovery Channel or on Viasat History Channel. If you’ve got a pet you would enjoy watching special programmes about cats and dogs on Animal Planet Channel. If you want to listen to hot discussions, visit RTVI Channel and choose anything to your taste.

Also there are many programmes about education and culture. There are programmes on wide range of subjects — from physics and literature to cooking and yoga. Public TV also broadcasts plays, ballets, symphonies as well as programs about art and history. So you’ve got a great choice.

5. Many people say that newspapers and radio are not as popular as TV and very soon they will lose their importance. What is your point of view?

Maybe. But I don’t think they will lose their importance. Probably they will change the forms. Many newspapers will be transformed into electronic versions on the Internet. As for radio, it has already lost its importance in its initial way of existence. Nowadays we can listen to the radio through the Internet.

Mass Media

Mass media are one of the most characteristic features of modern civilization. People are united into one global community with the help of mass media. People can learn about what is happening in the world very fast using mass media. The mass media include newspapers, magazines, radio and television. The earliest kind of mass media was newspaper. The first newspaper was Roman handwritten newssheet called “Acta Diurna” started in 59 B.C. Magazines appeared in 1700′s.

They developed from newspapers and booksellers’ catalogs. Radio and TV appeared only in the 20th century.

But, to tell you the truth, today’s teens are not really interested in any traditional media. Television, radio and newspapers are becoming less and less popular. Teenagers don’t read newspapers. Instead they watch the news summarized on the Internet or TV. The only newspapers that are read are the cheaper tabloids.

Nevertheless, newspapers are worth buying! They are a daily source of news, education and fun that no home should be without. In fact, every home should have at least 3 different newspapers a day to get a balanced opinion of world events. Also, buying newspapers you’re doing your bit for the local economy. As for tabloids, sometimes they come up with good stories. Just imagine the political scandals that would go unnoticed without reporters.

A variety of print media and electronic media of different forms of ownership is operating inBelarus. Foreign media are widely represented in the national media space, too.

As of1 January 2012, 678 newspapers and 676 magazines were published inBelarus. More than two thirds of them are private.

Printed press is available mainly in the Belarusian and Russian languages, though there are some newspapers in English, Polish, Ukrainian and German.

The most influential newspapers include “Belarus Segodnya”, “Respublika”, “Belarusy i rynok”, “Belgazeta”, “Svobodnye novosty”. Local editions of major Russian newspapers “Komsomolskaya Pravda” and “Argumenty i Fakty” are very popular inBelarus, too.

Nine national news agencies, including seven private ones, operate inBelarus.

The BelTA News Agency is the country’s biggest news agency, having the correspondent network in all the regions of the country.

Besides the local news agencies,Russia’s ITAR-TASS and Prime-TASS news agencies have their offices inMinsk. The correspondents of the leading world agencies Reuters [roiterz] and Associated Press also work inMinsk.

As of1 January 2012, there were 162 radio broadcast stations and 81 television broadcast stations inBelarus. Though, nowadays we are not interested in listening to the radio. The target audience of theBelarusradio station are foreigners interested in local events. The radio station airs programs not only in Belarusian and Russian, but also in English, German, Polish, French and Spanish.

There are 5 national TV broadcasters inBelarus. Today the broadcasting covers more than 60 countries. The channel is available to viewers fromEurope,Middle East,Central Asia,AfricaandNorth America. The channel also provides online broadcasting on the Internet. Over 100 international channels, including Euronews, BBC, Eurosport are broadcasted via cable TV.

The Constitution of the Republic of Belarus and the Law “On Mass Media” constitutes the legal basis of the media activity in Belarus.

The Constitution of the Republic of Belarus guarantees the freedom of thought, belief and expression, prohibits the monopolization of the media and censorship.

The Law “On Mass Media” formalizes the basic principles of mass media’s activity: accuracy, equality, respect for human rights and freedoms, diversity of views; protection of morals; observance of the norms of journalist’s professional ethics. But often the law is broken.

British mass media include 820 radio stations, 531 television channels, 1,598 newspapers and 1,971 magazines – from 270 media owners.

National newspapers in the UK were traditionally divided by format, between serious, intelligent, quality newspapers – broadsheets - and the sensational, popular or red-top tabloids. Several of the broadsheet newspapers have now changed to tabloid or Berliner formats. Even so, the difference in reputation between the two types still remains.

Broadsheets and ‘broadsheet style’ newspapers (serious ones but in Berliner or tabloid format) are The Daily Telegraph, The Times, The Sunday Times, The Guardian, The Observer, The Independent. Tabloids are The Daily Express, The Daily Mail, The Sun, The Mirror, The Daily Star, The People, The Daily Express.

The BBC has won the reputation for impartiality (áåñïðèñòðàñòèå) and objectivity in news reporting. It has been providing regular TV broadcasts since 1936.

Speaking about my personal preferences on TV, I wouldn’t say a lot, as I’m not a TV fan. But some of my peers still watch TV, often tuning into a particular season of TV show or sporting event like football. The members of my family also demonstrate great diversity in their tastes. My mother enjoys watching lifestyle programmes, talk shows, soaps, drama and sitcoms. My father prefers news and sports programmes. Sometimes I watch music programmes.

You would think that teens would be adopting the latest new media crazes like Twitter. Apparently, that’s not the case. They see no point in using Twitter. Most teens use “Vkontakte”, “Facebook” for social networking, they search and research topics with Google, watch videos on YouTube, and download music and films from file-sharing sites, watch films on-line. Teens use their smart phones as a source of information, for sharing music files with their friends using Bluetooth, since the service is free.

Today’s teenagers have grown up surrounded by technology and the Internet, so naturally they’re not going to be as interested in old media as the older generations are.

 

 


Date: 2015-01-29; view: 4023


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