Home Random Page


CATEGORIES:

BiologyChemistryConstructionCultureEcologyEconomyElectronicsFinanceGeographyHistoryInformaticsLawMathematicsMechanicsMedicineOtherPedagogyPhilosophyPhysicsPolicyPsychologySociologySportTourism






Omitting the connective in restrictive clauses

We may omit the relative pronouns who(m), that, which in restrictive attributive clauses if they are objects to the verb in the relative clause. This is extremely common in conversational English:

Heís a man people like at first sight.

Iíve lost the bananas I bought this morning.

Is there anything (that) I can do?

But they must not be left out if they are subjects of the relative clause:

The woman who lives next door is a doctor.

What happened to the money that was on the table?

 

Ex.6. Link the sentences with relative clauses omitting who or which where possible:

 

1. I know the company. Jack works for it. 2. I met a woman. She lives next door to Tina. 3. We are going to see the new James Bond film. Everybody is talking about it. 4. Susan reads a lot of books. They tell you how to be a success in business. 5. Look! There's the new teacher. I told you about her. 6. I'm wearing the leather jacket. My mother gave it to me on my birthday. 7. Did you meet the writer? He won the Booker Prize last year. 8. Have you been to this boutique? It has very trendy clothes. 9. I took my son to my parents' house. He was one year old. 10. She wanted to see her friends. They were on an expedition in the North. 11. I have to study mathematics. I do not enjoy it. 12. Can that be Mr. Bridgeman? We used to work with him. 13. This is the Director. He founded the company. 14. They went to see the flat. They lived in it when they were students. 15. The man is the manager. You spoke to him. 16. The woman is married. He's fallen in love with her. 17. The girl is one of his students. He's going out with her. 18. The course was a waste of time. I went on it.



 


Connectives with prepositions

DIY

 

Restrictive clauses may also be introduced by whom / which + preposition which can come either before the pronoun or at the end of the clause. In conversational English it is much more common to put prepositions at the end (and to leave out the pronoun):

 

formal style   conversational style
The woman with whom he fell in love left him after a few weeks. The woman he fell in love with left him ...
This is the room in which Churchill was born.   This is the room Churchill was born in.

 

Ex.7.

 

 

Ex.8.Link the sentences with relative clauses omitting who or which where possible.

1. I know the company. Jack works for it. 2. I met a woman. She lives next door to Tina. 3. We are going to see the new James Bond film. Everybody is talking about it. 4. Susan reads a lot of books. They tell you how to be a success in business. 5. Look! There's the new teacher. I told you about her. 6. I'm wearing the leather jacket. My mother gave it to me on my birthday. 7. Did you meet the writer? He won the Booker Prize last year. 8. Have you been to this boutique? It has very trendy clothes. 9.1 took my son to my parents' house. He was one year old. 10. She wanted to see her friends. They were on an expedition in the North. 11. I have to study mathematics. I do not enjoy it. 12. Can that be Mr. Bridgeman? We used to work with him. 13. This is the Director. He founded the company. 14. They went to see the flat. They lived in it when they were students. 15. The man is the manager. You spoke to him. 16. The woman is married. He's fallen in love with her. 17. The girl is one of his students. He's going out with her. 18. The course was a waste of time. I went on it.




Date: 2016-04-22; view: 958


<== previous page | next page ==>
UNIT 1. NON-APPOSITIVE ATTRIBUTIVE CLAUSES | UNIT 2. ADVERBIAL CLAUSES
doclecture.net - lectures - 2014-2021 year. Copyright infringement or personal data (0.002 sec.)