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Listen to the dialogue. While listening, make some notes and retell the content afterwards

 

Jumbled sentences. Put the words in the correct order

1. heard you ? about Mike have

_____________________________________________

2. the ? heard gossip have you latest

_____________________________________________

3. gossip bit of juiciest the got ever I've

_____________________________________________

4. to some you ? hear want gossip do

_____________________________________________

5. I've guess heard just you'll what never

_____________________________________________

6. else tell listen, anyone don't

_____________________________________________

7. from didn't you this didn't me hear

_____________________________________________

 

How to... Take offence

Listen to the dialogue. While listening, make some notes and retell the content afterwards



To the teacher: to practice the language from the programme, copy and cut up 1 set of prompts per group of 3-4 students. Make sure the students in each group get on well!

 

Place the cards face down in a pile. The first student takes a card and uses the prompt to make an offensive remark to a student of his/her choosing regarding his/her work in an imaginary company.

e.g. You're really lazy. You're always reading magazines and gossiping you never get your work done!

 

The student who the remark is directed as should respond appropriately: e.g. I'm sorry, I'm not going to let you talk to me like that. When the exchange is completed, the next student picks up a card and the cycle begins again.

 

lazy too much time on social networking sites under-qualified
late not enough experience for this job do stupid things
lots of mistakes unsuitable clothes for the job waste company money
leave the office too early disorganized long lunch breaks

 

How to... Ask for Permission

Listen to the dialogue. While listening, make some notes and retell the content afterwards

To the teacher: to practice the language from the programme, copy and cut up 1 set of prompts per group of 4-5 students. The cards are placed face down in a pile. The first student takes a card and uses the prompts to make a polite request to a student of his/her choosing

eg. Would it be ok if I borrowed your pen? The student who is asked the question can accept or decline as s/he wishes.

When the exchange is completed, the next student picks up a card and the cycle begins again.

borrow / pen use / mobile phone copy / homework
borrow / some money stay / your house help me / homework
borrow / your dictionary take / phone number call you tonight
borrow / book pay / dinner tonight ask / personal question

 

How to... Pointing out the positive side of a situation

Listen to the dialogue. While listening, make some notes and retell the content afterwards



Mingling activity

To the teacher: Copy and cut up the cards below. Make enough copies so that each student can have one card. Give the cards out and get students to mingle (tell them they are at a party): every time they meet another student, they have to have a short conversation, in which each student tells the other about something bad that has happened, using the prompt on their card. They respond by pointing out the positive side of the situation, and then move on, until all the students have spoken to each other.

 

I have to move out of my flat / house. I've got a lot of responsibility at work. My children are really naughty.
It costs me a fortune to travel to school / college / work My new computer keeps breaking down I got a really bad mark for my last assignment
My English grammar is really bad I got a new shirt for my birthday, but it's too big My team lost another match
I can't afford a foreign holiday this year My car broke down I bought some really expensive shoes and now I have no money left

 


UNIT 3

LONDON LIFE

Teaching Ideas

Here are some suggestions for ways to use London Life in your teaching. Most of them require little or no preparation.

Before Listening

1. Prediction: Show students the image that accompanies a programme and tell them a few pieces of key information about the programme: for example, the topic, location and name(s) of the person or people featured in the programme. Students then write down at least 5 questions that they think or hope will be answered by the programme: they then listen to see if their questions have been answered.

2. Web quest: Tell students the title and topic of the programme and give them 10-15 minutes to do an internet search for information on the topic. They make a few notes on what they find, and share the information with the rest of the class before listening.

3. Vocabulary preparation: Use the words and definitions given on the page for each programme to make a matching activity. Students complete the activity and listen to the programme to check and/or confirm their ideas.

4. Prediction 2: Write a few key words from the programme on the board and get students to guess what the programme will be about.

5. Vocabulary Bingo: Show students the image that accompanies a programme and tell them a few pieces of key information about the programme: for example, the topic, location and name(s) of the person or people featured in the programme. Students write down 10 words they think they will hear in the programme. They must be content words nouns, verbs, adjectives rather than words like 'and' or 'but'. Play the programme and students check off the words on their list as and when they hear them. The student who crosses off the most words, or who crosses off all 10 words first, is the winner.

While Listening

6. Prediction 3: Play part of a programme, but stop it at an appropriate point and ask students to suggest what they will hear next.

7. Jumbled script: Give students the transcript of a section of a programme, cut up line by line. They re-order the text and listen to the section to check.

8. Gapped script: Give students the transcript of a section of a programme, with key words blanked out. They try to guess what words should go in the gaps and then listen to the section to check.

9. Comprehension quiz: Students read / listen to a programme, then write 5-10 questions about it (the answers must be in the programme) and give then to another student to answer.

After Listening

10. Comparisons: Students make a list of similarities and differences between the aspect of London Life described in a programme and their own village, town or city.

11. Vocabulary exchange: Students write a list of words they would like to know the meanings of. Each group of 2-3 students looks up 2-3 words in an English English dictionary, and explains the words to the rest of the class.

12. Follow-up role-play: After listening, students write a list of questions they would like to ask: either about the topic of the programme, or to the person / people featured in the programme.

They then get into pairs or groups: they take roles such as presenter / guest and ask and answer the questions. If they don't know the answers they can use avoidance strategies or make something up!

13. Make your own programme: After listening to a programme students script a similar programme about their own village, town or city. They can record themselves and play back to the class, or if there is no recording equipment available, they can 'perform' their programme 'live' for the class.

 


Date: 2015-12-17; view: 743


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