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Interesting and interested



 


 


INTERESTING

The book is full of information. It's very

interesting.

The word interesting tells us what the book does to Mike — it interests him. A book can be interesting, boring, exciting or amusing, for example.

B Adjective pairs

Here are some more examples.


INTERESTED

Mike is very interested in UFOs.

The word interested tells us how Mike feels. A person can feel interested, bored, excited or amused, for example.


 


ING


ED


 


Tom told us an amusing story. The two-hour delay was annoying. I didn't enjoy the party. It was boring. This computer has some very confusing

instructions.

This wet weather is so depressing. It was very disappointing not to get the job. The game was really exciting. Going for a jog with Matthew is exhausting. I thought the programme on wildlife was

fascinating. For one frightening/terrifying moment 1

thought I was going to fall. I just don't understand. I find the whole thing

rather puzzling. Lying in a hot bath is relaxing. I think the way Jessica behaved was quite

shocking.

The test results were surprising. What thrilling news this is! Congratulations! The journey took all day and night. They found

it very tiring.


We were amused at Tom's story.

The passengers were annoyed about the delay.

I went to the party, but I felt bored.

I got very confused trying to make sense of the

instructions.

This weather makes me so depressed. I was very disappointed not to get the job. The United fans were excited. I'm exhausted after jogging all that way. I watched the programme on wildlife. I was

absolutely fascinated. When I got onto the roof I felt

frightened/terrified. I must say I'm puzzled. I just don't understand

I feel relaxed when I lie in a hot bath. I was quite shocked to see Jessica behaving

like that.

I was surprised at the test results. We were thrilled to hear your good news. After travelling all day and night they were

very tired.


 


107 Exercises

1 Interesting and interested (A-B) What are they saying? Put in these words: depressing, exciting, exhausted, fascinating, interested

► This is a depressing place.

1 I'm absolutely …………………….... 3 Chess is a........... ……………….. game.

2 I'm …………………... in astronomy. 4 This is really.……………………....!

2 Interesting and interested (A-B)

Complete the conversation. Write the complete word in each space.

Vicky: That was an (►) exciting (excit...) film, wasn't it?

Rachel: Oh, do you think so? I'm (1) ………………............... (surpris...) you liked it.

I thought it was rather (2) ....................................... (disappoint...).

Vicky: Well, I was (3)………………………….. (puzzl...) once or twice. I didn't understand the whole story.

It was (4)…………………………..(confus...) in places. But the end was good.

Rachel: I was (5)…………………………… (bor...) most of the time.

I didn't find it very (6) ........................................ (interest...).



3 Interesting and interested (A-B)

Complete the conversations using a word ending in ing or ed.

? David: I'm surprised how warm it is for March.
Melanie: Yes, all this sunshine is quite surprising.

? Vicky: I'm not very fit. I was pretty tired after climbing the mountain.
Natasha: Yes, I think everyone felt tired.

1 Trevor: I think I need to relax.

Laura: Well, lying by the pool should be...............................................................................

2 Vicky: It was annoying to lose my ticket.

Emma: You looked really.…………………….. ... when you had to buy another one.

3 Sarah: The cabaret was amusing.

Mark: Claire was certainly ............ ………………. .She couldn't stop laughing.

4 Daniel: The museum was interesting, wasn't it?

Rachel: It was OK. I was quite ...................................... in those old maps.

5 Matthew: I'm fascinated by these old photos.

Emma: I always find it........ …………………… to see what people looked like as children.

6 Rachel: Was it a big thrill meeting Tom Hanks?

Vicky: You bet. It was just about the most....................... ………………moment of my life.

I Sarah: You look exhausted. You should go to bed.

Mark: Driving down from Scotland was pretty ..............................................


108 Adjective or adverb? (1)

A Introduction

Vicky: / like that song that Natasha sang.

Rachel: Yes, it's a nice song. And she sang it nicely, too.

An adjective (nice) describes a noun (song). An adverb (nicely) describes a verb (sang).

The man had a quiet voice. The man spoke quietly.

Claire wears expensive clothes. Claire dresses expensively.

The runners made a slow start. They started the race slowly.

We do NOT say She sang it nice.

We can use adverbs in other ways. An adverb like really or very can be combined with an adjective (hot) o another adverb (carefully) (see Unit 115).

It was really hot in the sun. Andrew checked his work very carefully. An adverb like fortunately or perhaps says something about the whole situation.

Fortunately nothing was stolen. Perhaps Sarah is working late.

B The ly ending

We form many adverbs from an adjective + ly. For example politely, quickly, safely. But there are some special spelling rules.

1 We do not leave out e, e.g. nice —> nicely
Exceptions are true —> truly, whole —> wholly.

2 y—> ily after a consonant, e.g. easy —> easily, lucky —> luckily
Also angrily, happily, heavily, etc.

3 le —> ly, e.g. possible —> possibly

Also comfortably, probably, reasonably, sensibly, terribly, etc.

4 ic —. ically, e.g. dramatic —> dramatically

Also automatically, scientifically, etc. (Exception: publicly)

C Looked nice and looked carefully

Compare these two structures.

LINKING VERB + ADJECTIVE ACTION VERB + ADVERB

Tom was hungry. Paul ate hungrily.

The children seemed happy. The children played happily.

My soup has got cold. The man stared coldly at us.

An adjective can come after a linking verb such as We use an adverb when the verb means that

be (see Unit 104B). something happens.

Some verbs like look, taste and appear can be either linking verbs or action verbs.

LINKING VERB + ADJECTIVE ACTION VERB + ADVERB

Mike looked angry. He looked carefully at the signature.

The medicine tasted awful. Emma tasted the drink nervously.

The man appeared (to he) drunk. A waiter appeared suddenly.

page 380 American English


108 Exercises

1 Adverbs (A-B)

This is part of a story about a spy called X. Put in adverbs formed from these adjectives: bright, careful, fluent, immediate, patient, punctual, quiet, safe, secret, slow

The journey took a long time because the train travelled so (►) slowly. It was hot, and the sun shone
(1) ………………………… from a clear sky. X could only wait (2)……………………….. for the journey to

end. When the train finally arrived, he had no time to spare, so he (3)…………………………. took a taxi

to the hotel. Y was on time. She arrived (4)……………………….. at three. No one else knew about the

meeting - it was important to meet (5).......................... ………………. . 'I had a terrible journey,' said Y.

'But luckily the pilot managed to land (6)................................... ………….. .' Her English was good,

and she spoke very (7) …………………. X was listening (8)……………………….. to every word.

They were speaking very (9) .............................................. in case the room was bugged.

2 The ly ending (B)

Look at the information in brackets and put in the adverbs. Be careful with the spelling.

► (Emma's toothache was terrible.) Emma's tooth ached terribly.

1 (Henry was angry.) Henry shouted............................................................................................. at the waiter.

2 (I'm happy sitting here.) I can sit here .................................................................................. ..for hours.

3 (The switch is automatic.) The machine switches itself off ............................................. …………………….

4 (The debate should be public.) We need to debate the matter..................................... ………………………..

5 (Everyone was enthusiastic.) Everyone discussed the idea ………………………………………

6 (We should be reasonable.) Can't we discuss the problem................................... ……………………………... ?

7 (The building has to be secure.) Did you lock all the doors..................................... …………………………….. ?

3 Adverb or adjective? (A-B)

Decide what you need to say. End your sentence with an adverb ending in ly.

► Tell the police that you can't remember the accident. It isn't very clear in your mind.
I can’t remember the accident very clearly.

1 Tell your friend that United won the game. It was an easy win.

2 Tell your boss that you've checked the figures. You've been careful.

3 Tell your neighbour that his dog barked at you. It was very fierce.

4 You are phoning your friend. Tell him about the rain where you are. It's quite heavy.

4 Adverb or adjective? (A-C)

Vicky is telling Rachel about a dream she had. Choose the correct forms.

l had a (►)strange/strangely dream last night. I was in a garden. It was getting (1) dark/darkly, and it was

(2) terrible/terribly cold. My head was aching (3) bad/badly. I was walking out of the garden when

(4) sudden/suddenly I saw a man. He was sitting (5) quiet/quietly on a seat. He seemed very

(6) unhappy/unhappily. He looked up and smiled (7) sad/sadly at me. I don't know why, but I felt

(8) curious/curiously about him. I wanted to talk to him, but I couldn't think what to say.

I just stood there (9) foolish/foolishly.


109 Adjective or adverb? (2)

A Friendly, likely, etc

The ending ly is the normal adverb ending (see Unit 108). But a few adjectives also end in ly. Melanie was very friendly. It was a lively party. We had a lovely time.

Some more examples are: elderly, likely, lonely, silly, ugly

The words are adjectives, not adverbs (not She-spoke to us friendly). And we cannot add ly. There is no such word as friendlily. But we can say in a friendly way/manner.

She spoke to us in a friendly way. If we need to use an adverb, we often choose another word of similar meaning.

It was lovely. Everything went beautifully.

B Hard, fast, etc

Compare these sentences.

ADJECTIVE ADVERB

We did some hard work. We worked hard.

I came on the fast train. The train went quite fast.

We can use these words both as adjectives and as adverbs:

deep, early, fast, hard, high, late, long, low, near, right, straight, wrong (For hardly, nearly, etc, see C.

In informal English, the adjectives cheap, loud, quick and slow can be adverbs.

ADJECTIVE ADVERB

They sell cheap clothes in the market. They sell things cheap/cheaply there.

Back already! That was quick. Come as quick/quickly as you can.

C Hard, hardly, near, nearly, etc

There are some pairs of adverbs like hard and hardly which have different meanings.

Here are some examples.

/ tried hard, but I didn't succeed.

I've got hardly any money left, {hardly any = very little, almost none)

Luckily I found a phone box quite near. I nearly fell asleep in the meeting, {nearly = almost)

Rachel arrived late, as usual. I've been very busy lately, {lately = in the last few days/weeks)

The plane flew high above the clouds. The material is highly radioactive, {highly = very)

We got into the concert free, {free = without paying)

The animals are allowed to wander freely, {freely = uncontrolled)

D Good and well

Good is an adjective, and well is its adverb. The opposites are bad and badly.

ADJECTIVE ADVERB

Natasha is a good violinist. She plays the violin very well.

Our test results were good. We all did well in the test.

I had a bad night. I slept badly last night.

Well can also be an adjective meaning 'in good health', the opposite of ill.

My mother was very ill, but she's quite well again now. How are you? ~ Very well, thank you.


109 Exercises

Friendly, hard, hardly, etc (A-C)

Decide if each underlined word is an adjective or an adverb.

? That new building is rather ugly. adjective

? I'd like to arrive early if I can. adverb

 

1 1 haven't seen you for a long time.

2 Why are you wearing that silly hat?

3 Very young children travel free.

4 The temperature is quite high today.

5 We nearly missed the bus this morning

6 Do you have to play that music so loud?

2 Friendly, hard, hardly, etc (A-C)

Complete the conversation. Decide if you need ly with the words in brackets.

Mark: How did you get on with Henry today?

Sarah: Oh, we had a nice lunch and some (►) lively (live)conversation. Henry was charming, as usual.

He gave me a lift back to the office, but it was (1)………………. (hard) worth risking our lives to

save a few minutes. He (2)....................... (near) killed us.

Mark: What do you mean?

Sarah: Well, we'd sat a bit too (3)………………... (long) over our meal, and we were

(4)……………………..(late) getting back to work. Henry drove very (5)………… (fast). I tried

(6) ………………..... (hard) to keep calm, but I was quite scared. We went (7)…………… (wrong)

and missed a left turn, and Henry got annoyed. Then a van came round the corner, and it was
coming (8)……….......... (straight) at us. I don't know how we missed it.

Mark: Well, I'm glad you did. And next time you'd better take a taxi.

3 Good and well (D)

Complete the conversation. Put in good, well (x2), bad, badly and ill.

Rachel: How did you and Daniel get on in your tennis match?

Matthew: We lost. I'm afraid we didn't play very (►) well. Daniel made some (1)……………. mistakes.

It wasn't a very (2)…………… day for us. We played really (3)………………………

Andrew: I heard Daniel's in bed at the moment because he isn't very (4)………………
Matthew: Yes, I'm afraid he's been (5)………….... for several days, but he's better now.

4 Friendly, hard, hardly, etc (A-D)

Complete the conversation. Choose the correct form.

Daniel: Is it true you saw a ghost last night?

Vicky: Yes, I did. I went to bed (►) late/lately, and I was sleeping (1) bad/badly. I suddenly woke up in

the middle of the night. I went to the window and saw the ghost walking across the lawn. Daniel: Was it a man or a woman? Vicky: A woman in a white dress. I had a (2) good/well view from the window, but she walked very (3) fast/fastly. She wasn't there very (4) long/longly. I'd (5) hard/hardly caught sight of her before she'd gone. I (6) near/nearly missed her. Daniel: You don't think you've been working too (7) hard/hardly? You've been looking a bit pale (8) late/lately.

Vicky: I saw her, I tell you. Daniel: It isn't very (9) like/likely that ghosts actually exist, you know. I expect you were imagining it.


Test 18 Adjectives and adverbs (Units 104-109)

Test 18A

Choose the correct word or phrase.

► We walked stew/slowly back to the hotel.

1 We could walk free/freely around the aircraft during the flight.

2 The young/The young man with dark hair is my sister's boyfriend.

3 I'm getting quite hungry/hungrily.

4 The man looked thoughtful/thoughtfully around the room.

5 Have I filled this form in right/rightly?

6 I think Egypt is a fascinated/fascinating country.

7 The two sisters do alike/similar jobs.

8 I'm pleased the plan worked so good/goodly/well.

9 She invented a new kind of wheelchair for the disabled/the disabled people.

10 I'm very confused/confusing about what to do.

11 They performed the experiment scientifically/scientificly.

12 The hostages must be very afraid/frightened people.

Test 18 B

Put the words in the right order to form a statement.

► a / bought / coat/ I I new / red
/ bought a new red coat.

1 a / is / nice / place / this

2 biscuit / can't / find /1 / large / the / tin

3 a / behaved / in / silly / Tessa / way

4 coffee / cold / getting / is / your

5 a / house / in / live / lovely / old / stone / they

6 for / hospital / ill / is / mentally / the / this

Test 18C

Write the words in brackets and add ly, ing or ed only if you need to.

Janet: Is this the (►) new (new...) car you've just bought?

Nigel: That's right. Well, it's second-hand of course.

Janet: It's (►) exciting (excit...) buying a car, isn't it?

Nigel: Well, it was a bit of a problem actually because I didn't have much money to spend. But I managed

to find one that wasn't very (1) ............................ (expensive...).

Janet: It looks very (2).................................. (nice...), I must say.

Nigel: It's ten years old, so I was (3)……………………. (surpris...) what good condition it's in. The man

I bought it from is over eighty, and he always drove it very (4)……………………… (careful...),he

said. He never took it out if it was raining, which I find (5)……………………. (amus...).

Janet: I think (6)……………………. (elder...) people look after their cars better than young people

Nigel: He was a (7)…………………….. (friend...) old chap. He even gave me all these maps

(8).................................... (free...).


Test 18 D

Write a second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first. Use the word in brackets.

► Jonathan was stupid, (behaved)
Jonathan behaved stupidly.

1 The drink had a strange taste, (tasted)

2 Obviously, sick people need to be looked after, (the)

3 The dog slept, (asleep)

4 The young woman was polite, (spoke)

5 The train was late, (arrived)

6 The film's ending is dramatic, (ends)

7 Polly gave an angry shout, (shouted)

8 Billiards is a game for indoors, (indoor)

9 The clown amused people, (amusing)

10 There was almost no time left, (any)

Test 18 E

Some of these sentences are correct, but most have a mistake. If the sentence is correct, put a tick (/"). If it is incorrect, cross the sentence out and write it correctly.

? Your friend looked rather ill. V

? It was-a-steel long-pipe. It was a long steel pipe.

 

1 I tasted the soup careful.

2 It's a beautiful old English church.

3 Are they asleep children?

4 It's a school for the deaf people.

5 It's a leather new nice jacket.

6 The riches are very lucky.

7 You handled the situation well.

8 He used a green paper thick towel.

9 Our future lies with the young.

10 The course I started was bored.

11 I often talk to the two old next door.

12 The smoke rose highly into the air.

13 It feels warm in here.

14 We felt disappointing when we lost

15 Everyone seemed very nervously.

16 Tessa drives too fastly.

17 This scenery is really depressing.

 

110 Comparative and superlative forms

We form the comparative and superlative of short adjectives (e.g. cheap) and long adjectives (e.g. expensive) in different ways.

COMPARATIVE SUPERLATIVE

Short word, e.g. cheap: cheaper (the) cheapest

Long word, e.g. expensive: more expensive (the) most expensive

For less and least, see Unit 112A.

There are some less expensive ones here, look.

B Short and long adjectives

One-syllable adjectives (e.g. small, nice) usually have the er, est ending.

Your hi-fi is smaller. Emma needs a bigger computer.

This is the nicest colour. This room is the warmest. But we use more, most before words ending in ed.

Everyone was pleased at the results, but Vicky was the most pleased.

We also use more, most with three-syllable adjectives (e.g. ex-cit-ing) and with longer ones. The film was more exciting than the book. This dress is more elegant. We did the most interesting project. This machine is the most reliable.

Some two-syllable adjectives have er, est, and some have more, most. Look at this information.

TWO-SYLLABLE ADJECTIVES

1 Words ending in a consonant + y have er, est, e.g. happy * happier, happiest.
Examples are: busy, dirty, easy, funny, happy, heavy, lovely, lucky, pretty, silly, tidy

2 Some words have er, est or more, most, e.g. narrow narrower, narrowest or more narrow, most namt
Examples are: clever, common, cruel, gentle, narrow, pleasant, polite, quiet, simple, stupid, tired

3 The following words have more, most, e.g. useful * more useful, most useful.
a Words ending in ful or less, e.g. careful, helpful, useful; hopeless

b Words ending in ing or ed, e.g. boring, willing; annoyed, surprised

c Many others, e.g. afraid, certain, correct, eager, exact, famous, foolish, frequent, modern, nervous, normal, recent


C Spelling

There are some special spelling rules for the er and est endings.

1 e -> er, est, e.g. nice ~> nicer, nicest, large ~> larger, largest.
Also brave, fine, safe, etc

2 y-> ier, iest after a consonant, e.g. happy -> happier, happiest.
Also lovely, lucky, pretty, etc

3 Words ending in a single vowel letter + single consonant letter -> double the consonant
e.g. hot -> hotter, hottest, big -> bigger, biggest.

Also fit, sad, thin, wet, etc (but w does not change, e.g. new -> newer)

For more details, see page 371.

D The comparison of adverbs

Some adverbs have the same form as an adjective, e.g. early, fast, hard, high, late, long, near. They form the comparative and superlative with er, est.

Can't you run faster than that? Andrew works the hardest. Note also the spelling of earlier and earliest.

Many adverbs are an adjective + ly, e.g. carefully, easily, nicely, slowly. They form the comparative and superlative with more, most.

We could do this more easily with a computer.

Of all the players it was Matthew who planned his tactics the most carefully.

In informal English we use cheaper, cheapest, louder, loudest, quicker, quickest and slower, slowest rather than more cheaply, the most loudly, etc. Melanie reacted the quickest. You should drive slower in fog.

Note the forms sooner, soonest and more often, most often.

Try to get home sooner. I must exercise more often.

E Irregular forms

Good, well, bad, badly and far have irregular forms.

ADJECTIVE/ADVERB COMPARATIVE SUPERLATIVE

good/well better best

bad/badly worse worst

far farther/further farthest/furthest

You've got the best handwriting. How much further are we going?

We can use elder, eldest + noun instead of older, oldest, but only for people in the same family. My elder/older sister got married last year.

F Comparing quantities

We use more, most and their opposites less and least to compare quantities. I haven't got many books. You've got more than I have. The Hotel Bristol has the most rooms. Trevor spends less on clothes than Laura does. Emma made the least mistakes.


 


110 Exercises

1 The comparison of adjectives (A-B) Complete the sentences. Use these adjectives: beautiful, expensive, high, interesting, tall

? The giraffe is taller than the man.

? The CD is more expensive than the cassette.

 

1 Detective stories.................................................................................. than algebra.

2 The top of the mountain...................................................................... than the clouds.

3 The acrobat.......................................................................................... than the clown.

2 The comparison of adjectives (A-B)

Tom is a United fan. He never stops talking about them. Put in the superlative form of the adjectives.

? Everyone's heard of United. They're the most famous (famous) team in the world.

? They've got a long history. They're the oldest (old) club in England.

 

1 They've got lots of money. They're the.......................................................... (rich) club in the country.

2 Their stadium is new. It's the ........................................................ (modern) stadium in Europe.

3 United are wonderful. They're the…………………………………. (great) club in the world.

4 And what a team! It's the ………………………………………. (exciting) team ever.

5 They've got lots of fans. They're the.................... ………………….... (popular) team in the country.

6 United have won everything. They're the.................. …………………(successful) team ever.

7 They're good to watch. They play the................ ……………….. (attractive) football.

8 United fans are happy. We're the ............... ……………………… (happy) people in the world.

3 The comparison of adjectives (A-C)

Complete the advertisements with the comparative form of the adjective.

? Use Get-It-Clean and you'll get your floors cleaner

? Elegant Wallpapers simply look more elegant

 

1 Watch a Happy Video and you'll feel……………………………..

2 Wear a pair of Fast Shoes and you'll be a…………………….. runner.

3 Helpful Cookbooks are a......... ………. ........... guide to cooking.

4 Wash your hair with Lovely Shampoo for.............. …………… hair.

5 Try a Big-Big Burger and you'll have a ……………………. meal.

6 Restful Beds give you a..... ………………… night.

7 Wear Modern Fashions for a ................................. look.


4 The comparison of adverbs (D)

Put in the comparative form of these adverbs: carefully, early, easily, high, long, loud, often, smartly

? I was too nervous to go higher than halfway up the tower.

? We could have found the place more easily with a map.

 

1 Do you have to wear those old jeans, Mike? Can't you dress.. ……………………. ... ?

2 You needn't go yet. You can stay a bit .................................................................

3 There are lots of break-ins. They happen ................ …………………………. nowadays.

4 If you do it again ......................................................... , you won't make so many mistakes.

5 The film starts at eight, but we should get to the cinema a few
minutes....................................................................... …..

6 We can't hear. Could you speak a bit............................................ ……….. ?

5 Irregular forms (E)

Matthew and Emma are walking in the country. Put in further, furthest, better, best, worse and worst.

Emma: I'm not used to country walks. How much (►) further is it?

Matthew: Not far. And it gets better. We've done the (1)..... ………………… part. Look, the path gets

easier. It goes downhill from here. I hope you're feeling (2)……………………… now, Emma.

Emma: I feel dreadful, actually, (3) ……………………… than before.

Matthew: Oh, dear. Do you want to have a rest?
Emma: No, the (4) ………………………. thing would be to get home as soon as we can. I'm not very fit,

you know. This is the (5) ……………………… I've walked for a long time.

6 Comparing quantities (F)

Put in more, most, less (x2) and least.

Laura: Our new car is smaller, so it uses (►) less petrol. They tested some small cars, and this one costs

the (1)…………………… to run of all the cars in the test. It's very economical, so Trevor likes

it. He wants to spend (2).................................... on motoring.

Harriet: Can you get three people in the back?

Laura: Not very easily. We had (3)………………………... room in our old car. (4)……………………..

cars take five people, but not this one.

7 Comparative and superlative forms (A-F)

Write the correct forms.

? You're the lac-kyest person I know. luckiest

? The situation is getting difficulter. more difficult

 

1 I was happyer in my old job.

2 I've got the most small office.

3 This photo is the goodest.

4 Last week's meeting was mere-sheFt.

5 Money is the importantest thing.

6 Is Rachel elder than Vicky?

7 This game is exciteger than the last one.

8 Of all the students, Andrew does the mere work.

9 This month has been weter than last month.

10 The prices are mere-low here.

11 I feel mere-bad than I did yesterday.



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