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All, half, most, some, no and none

A All, most and some

We can use all, most and some before a plural or an uncountable noun.

All plants need water. All matter is made up of atoms.

Most people would like more money. Some food makes me ill.

All plants means 'all plants in general/in the world'. Most people means 'most people in this country/in the world'. Some food means 'some food but not all food'. Here some is pronounced /sA.m/.

B All of, half of, most of and some of

Laura: Why do you keep all of these clothes? You never wear most of them. You've had some of your jackets for ten years. Why don't you throw them all out? This one is completely out of fashion. Trevor: Well, I thought if I waited long enough, it might come back into fashion.

All of these clothes has a specific meaning. Laura is talking about Trevor's clothes, not about clothes in general.

We can use all (of), half (of), most of and some of. Have all (of) the plants died? ~ No, not all of them. Most of the people who live around here are students. I've spent most of my money already. Half {of ) the audience left before the end of the film. Some of that food from the party was all right, but I threw some of it away.

We can leave out of after all or half, but not before a pronoun.

all of these clothes on all the clothes but all of them not all them

half of our group or half our group BUT half of us not half us We can also use all in mid position (see Unit 113B) or after a pronoun.

These cups are all dirty. I'll have to clean them all.

The guests have all gone now. I think they all enjoyed themselves.

We can use most and some on their own.

The band sang a few songs. Most were old ones, but some were new.

C All meaning 'everything' or 'the only thing'

We can use all with a clause to mean 'everything' or 'the only thing'.

Tell me all you know. All I did was ask a simple question. Here you know and I did are clauses. We do not normally use all without the clause.

Tell me everything, not Tell-me-all.

D No and none

We use no with a noun.

We've rung all the hotels, and there are no rooms available. I'm afraid I've got no money. (= I haven't got any money.)

We use none with of or on its own.

None of my friends will be at the party. Look at these clothes. None of them are in fashion now. I wanted some cake, but there was none left, not There-was no left.

86 Cars or the cars? 94 Some and any 103 Everyone, etc


96 Exercises

1 All, most, half, some and none (B, D)

Read this advertisement for some new flats and then complete the sentences. Put in all of them, most of them, half of them, some of them and none of them.

Hartley House is an old manor house which has been converted into thirty one-bedroom and two-bedroom flats. All the flats have a fitted kitchen, bathroom and large living-room. Ten of them have a separate dining-room. Twenty-five of the flats have a view of the sea, and fifteen have a private balcony. All thirty flats are still for sale. Ring us now for more details.



► The flats are modern. All of them have a fitted kitchen.

1 …………………….have two bedrooms.

2 From …………………….. you can see the sea.

3 ……………………….. have a private balcony.

4 …………………………have a large living-room.

5 There's also a dining-room in ……………………

6 ……………………..has been sold yet.

2 All, most, some and none (B, D)

There was a quiz evening yesterday. Six friends took part, and they all answered twenty questions. Did they get all, most, some or none of them right?

? Natasha answered all twenty correctly. She got all of them right.

? Daniel's score was fifteen. He got most of them right.

 

1 Jessica had only eight correct answers.

2 Matthew got them all right except three.

3 Andrew gave twenty correct answers.

4 But poor Vicky didn't get a single one right

3 All, most, no and none (A-D)

Complete the conversations. Use the word in brackets with all, all the, most, most of the, no or none of the.

► Andrew: I wonder where they make this milk.

Jessica: It isn't made in a factory, Andrew. All milk (milk) comes from animals.

► Rita: What do you usually do on a Sunday?

Mike: Not much. We spend most of the time (time) reading the papers.

1 Claire: In general, people aren't interested in politics, are they?

Mark: I think ……………………………... (people) are bored by the subject.

2 Vicky: These new flats are supposed to be for students.

Rachel: That's ridiculous………………………………….(student) in the world could possibly afford

such a high rent.

3 Tom: Who's paying for the new ice-rink to be built?

Nick: Well, …………………………………(money) will come from the government, but the city

has to pay a quarter of the cost.

4 Melanie: We should ban cars.................................................. (cars) pollute the air, don't they?

David: Well, except electric ones, I suppose.

5 Vicky: What kind of fruit should you eat to stay healthy?

Natasha: I don't think it matters……………………………….. (fruit) is good for you, isn't it?

6 Tom: I knew there had been a power cut because it was so dark everywhere.
Harriet: Yes, .......................................... (lights) in our street went out.



Date: 2014-12-22; view: 1381


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