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TWENTY PRINCIPAL APTITUDES

A – Personal Relations 1 – Autonomy; 2 – Communication skills; 3 – Availability; 4 – Empathy; 5 – Team spirit; 6 – Sense for negotiation; 7 – Teaching skills
B – Research 1 – An enquiring mind
C – Analysis 1 – Analytical ability; 2 – Critical ability; 3 – Ability to synthesise;
D – Communication 1 – Discretion; 2 – Responsiveness
E – Managing 1 – Perseverance; 2 – Rigour
F – Organising 1 – Adaptability; 2 – Foresight; 3 – Decisiveness; 4 – Initiative; 5 – Sense of organisation

A – PERSONAL RELATIONS

Autonomy– The ability to act independently of others, other values and social expectations. Capacity to take initiative and decisions, choose the correct solutions without depending on a hierarchy, even in the case of a previously unknown question due to the renewed configuration of previously known elements.

Communication skills– The knowledge of how to enter easily into relations with others in an open and efficient way. To be able to formulate a message or transmit an explicit piece of information whether in terms of content or presentation, using appropriate channels, to either an individual or a defined group; to encourage feedback and to adjust the message according to its perceived effects.

Availability– To always consider that the requests or propositions made by others are worth listening to, except when one has the objective certainty that what one is doing is even more important for the common good; to free oneself from an activity in order to assist a colleague or a user; to accept being interrupted and, after the interruption, to be able to pick up an activity where one left off.

Empathy– The ability to perceive what another feels by paying attention to what he/she says and being open to his/her preoccupations, and consequently, to reconsider one’s own point of view on the matter. By understanding the other’s request, his/her point of view, his/her arguments, it is possible to treat a request while retaining the necessary distance to look for objective information.

Team spirit– To carry out properly one’s share of work in partnership with other members of a group or department, exchanging and sharing information, tools and know-how, in pursuit of common objectives (to satisfy a request, improve the efficiency of a work unit, etc.) without putting one’s own interests first and being careful not to keep information (or documents) for one’s own sole use.

Sense for negotiation– To take into account conflicting interests in order to lead the two parties towards a common solution in which both are satisfied. By highlighting negotiation rather than confrontation, research can be achieved, a project implemented, and above all the fundamental mission of information services is respected. Beyond this aptitude, there is an art to negotiation that can be learned and cultured as with any competency.

Teaching skills– To know how to impart knowledge to others in an understandable way and form appropriate to their needs. To adapt one’s language to suit their level of attention and interest. To explain and make a listener clearly comprehend the facts of a situation or of a problem by adjusting oneself to his/her level. Evaluate and re-evaluate understanding and appropriateness.



B – RESEARCH

1 – An enquiring mind– To be open to external events and new developments which concern one’s own work environment as well as the interests of the users; to seize every opportunity to enrich one’s knowledge and reflective capacity.

C – ANALYSIS

Analytical ability– To recognise the specific elements or characteristics of a situation or problem within a document (whatever the medium), a collection of data or a request. To be able to group these elements into distinct categories. To establish relationships of causality or interdependence and be able to explain what they are.

Critical ability– To be able to evaluate an assertion, a document, a person, an organisation, a way of working, a technique for information handling, etc. so as to identify both strengths and weaknesses. To be able to put a piece of information in context, for example with reference to its veracity or the reliability of its source.

Ability to synthesise– To rearrange distinct elements according to their relevant characteristics in relation to a defined objective. To identify the most important, and arrange them in a hierarchy. To create a new information product or service, organised according to what is considered to be the most important of these, allocating a subordinate position to the remainder.

D – COMMUNICATION

1. Discretion– To gather information, either by listening to others, or by observing events, without communicating this information if it is confidential or susceptible to cause damage to other people, programmes or projects, etc. To be discreet in treating enquiries, respecting confidentiality and having reserve.

2. Resourcefulness– To rapidly undertake an enquiry for information or a document in its totality and give at the same time a preliminary answer or advice about directions to take without waiting to have all of the information.

E – MANAGING

1. Perseverance– To maintain a willingness to see a project through, to pursue and bring to fruition an activity in spite of the difficulties which may arise; not giving way to despondency.

2. Rigour– To respect scrupulously a predefined framework or rules (for example, a particular standard of bibliographic description, analytical template for documents, working procedures, etc.). Not to allow oneself or others any bending or exception to the rules that is not seriously justified. Ensure the finalization of the work and the quality of the different components.

F – ORGANISING

Adaptability– To find appropriate responses to new or unforeseen working methods or situations, for example in a subject outside the normal field of activity. To moderate one’s action or professional approach in response to a particular environment or specific constraints. To know how to implement or adapt a solution.

Foresight– To know how to think ahead; to anticipate an event, a succession of acts or the consequences of an action. For example, to know how to deduce and satisfy a potential information need on the basis of the known or likely way that a user activity is developing. To take appropriate measures without waiting for an unpleasant incident to occur.

Decisiveness– To choose a particular course of action and take a decision at an opportune moment, given the objectives and the means available, taking into account opposing arguments and keeping to this initial choice. To avoid uselessly drawing out deliberation.

Initiative– To use one’s imagination, to make proposals, to start projects and to get things organised without being asked by anyone else, or following only that which is specified in the job description in a new, conflicting or difficult situation. This applies equally to situations within one’s own work unit or within the framework of user relations.

Sense of organisation– To apply a global view to one’s activities or a work procedure, knowing how to comprehend the different dimensions and component parts of an operation as well as the respective roles of the different players; to grasp the more or less complex stakes of a situation; to choose and apply an appropriate method; to use one’s time wisely; to make sure basic activities are co-ordinated and the course of events controlled; to evaluate and adjust one’s approach according to results.

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Euroguide LIS: 2 vol.: Levels of qualification for European information professionals / European Council of Information Associations (ECIA). – [2nd ed.] – Euroréférentiel, 2004.– Available at:http://www.certidoc.net/en/euref2-english.pdf

Level 1: Assistant in information services

An individual who assumes to have the qualification of an “assistant in information services” has had some training, by whatever means. First, he/she must recognise the code of practices (methods, standards, etc.), or at least that these standards exist, and he/she can cite them.

He/she knows how to execute one or several tasks that he/she is especially prepared for by dutifully applying the rules that he/she has learned. He/she works under the responsibility of another, more qualified professional.

He/she is often part of a team in which a manager defines his/her responsibilities and modifies them as

necessary. He/she may find him/herself to be the only information professional in a group exercising another profession (e.g. lawyers, doctors, researchers), and is, in this case, autonomous.

He/she knows how to use basic equipment correctly.

He/she knows how to recognise a characteristic malfunction and to determine in which case an external specialist should intervene.

He/she demonstrates limited professional competencies that, according to the scale provided in the Euroguide LIS,, Volume 1, can reach:

− level one in each field of the Information (I) group. Nevertheless, it is possible to compensate the weaknesses found in one or several fields by attaining a higher level of competence in one or several of the other fields in the group.

− level one in 10 (of the 20) fields in groups T, C and M, under the condition that he/she achieve level 1 in at least two of the fields of expertise from each group.

He/she otherwise demonstrates aptitudes that are generally considered useful or necessary to professional practice. Those that are most appreciated at his/her level of qualification seem to be adaptability, « an enquiring mind » and perseverance. These are difficult to measure, but an appropriate interview, conducted with experienced professionals, should allow them to manifest themselves.

Level 2: Technician in information services

A professional who assumes to have the qualification of “technician in information services” has received an education, by one means or another, that gives him/her a good understanding of the code of practices (methods, standards, etc.) and the principles that guide them. He/she is capable of applying these advisedly.

He/she can interpret and adapt these principles to specific situations.

He/she is able to perform the diverse tasks inherent in an organised document service or required of a professional fulfilling a documentary function in an existing, operating system. He/she may be helped by the collaborators a small team of which he/she leads.

He/she acts autonomously, while answering to a hierarchical superior and following his/her instructions.

He/she can be made responsible for a small or medium sized document service.

He/she knows how to react when faced with a malfunction in the document service and immediately calls outside specialists most qualified to resolve the problem.

He/she has and knows how to use professional competencies that, according to the scale provided in the Euroguide LIS, Volume 1, reach:

- level 2 in each of the fields in group I. Nevertheless, it is possible to compensate for the weaknesses in one or several fields by reaching a higher level of competence in one or several of the other fields in the group.

- level 2 in 11 fields (of the 20) in groups T, C and M, under the condition that he/she achieve level 2 in at least two of the fields of expertise from each group.

He/she otherwise demonstrates aptitudes generally considered as useful or necessary to professional practice.

He/she especially takes advantage of his/her team spirit, the rigour with which he/she executes the tasks under his/her responsibility, and is known for his/her discretion which leads him/her to place great value on the confidentiality of information that he/she is aware of. As with all aptitudes, these are difficult to measure, but an interview, conducted with experienced professionals, should allow them to manifest themselves.

Level 3: Manager in information services

A professional who assumes to have the qualification for « manager in information services » must have had theoretical education and practical training that give him/her a profound understanding of the code of practices (methods, standards, etc.) and their guiding principles. He/she can also modify and renew them.

He/she is capable of organising and operating a complex information system that responds to a determined need, by using all types of resources and by applying the appropriate techniques.

He/she is prepared to supervise and direct working teams, to manage budgets and to lead projects. He/she demonstrates confirmed experience in team supervision.

He/she has the capacity to innovate and to anticipate, for example by originating and implementing a new document service or by developing a new, cost reducing method for the maintenance of an information system.

He/she shows proof of his/her ability to realise services of this type.

He/she has and displays professional competencies that, according to the scale provided in the Euroguide LIS, Volume 1, reach:

- level 3 in each of the fields of group I. Nevertheless, it is possible to compensate for the weaknesses in one or several fields by attaining a higher level of competence in one or several other fields of the group;

- level 3 in 12 fields (of the 20) in groups T, C and M, under the condition that he/she achieve level 3 in at least two of the fields of expertise within each group.

He/she otherwise possesses aptitudes generally considered useful or necessary to professional practice and which his functions frequently lead him/her to demonstrate. For example, it is expected that he/she have a sense of organisation, decisiveness and initiative. In addition to his/her proficient competence, these aptitudes contribute greatly to his/her efficiency.

Level 4: Expert in information services

A professional who assumes to have the qualification of “expert in information services” must first demonstrate all of the understanding and ability that are needed to become a “manager in information services” (see level 3).

On top of this is added a particularly profound understanding and experience of a specialisation (or group of complementary specialisations) in the field of information services that make it possible to evaluate every aspect of a situation, to imagine a solution to a new problem, to invent a methodology and to question the theoretical concepts in the particular field of expertise in question.

His/her experience as expert in the field must be sufficiently varied and proven over a long period.

He/she can perform documentary auditing, complete missions of technical expertise and intervene as a consultant to large institutions or organisations.

He/she takes responsibility and participates in the implementation of solutions that he/she has recommended.

Recognised by peers, he/she shares his experience and frequently uses different means of scientific communication (e.g. professional journals, reports, conferences, etc.) to convey this knowledge. He/she can prove that he/she has contributed such interventions in several different locations.

On the scale of competencies provided in volume 1 of the Euroguide LIS, his/her competencies reach:

- level 4 in 7 of the fields of expertise in group I and level 3 in the 6 other fields of this group. Nevertheless, it is possible to compensate for the weaknesses in one or several of the fields by attaining a higher level of competence in one or several of the other fields of the group;

- level 4 in 13 of the fields (of the 20) in groups T, C and M, under the condition that he/she attain level 4 in at least two fields of expertise from each group.

His/her aptitudes played a role in the choice of his specialisation. He/she continues to work on developing those aptitudes whose efficiency he/she has recognised in the chosen sector of activity. Whatever this sector is, his/her role at this elevated level of qualification requires him/her to continue to develop generally valued aptitudes such as analytical ability or the ability to synthesize, as well as communication and teaching skills.

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National Occupational Standards : Information and Library Services, Archive Services and Records Management / Lifelong Learning UK (LLUK).– LLUK ILS-AS-RM NOS ; List of standards ; ILS-AS-RM NOS. April 2008. – Available at: http://www.ukstandards.co.uk/Find_Occupational_Standards.aspx?NosFindID=4&FormMode=ViewModeSuite&SuiteID=1434 or http://www.ukstandards.co.uk/Admin/DB/0030/ILS-AS-RM%20NOS.pdf

List of standards

Area A – Planning, developing and evaluating services

Area B – Governance and ethics

Area C – Identifying, evaluating and acquiring content and collections

Area D – Managing knowledge

Area E – Managing content and collections

Area F – Facilitating access to and use of content and collections

Area G – Facilitating lifelong learning

Area H – Managing people to deliver services

List of standards

Area A – Planning, developing and evaluating services

A1Understand the external environment

A2Understand the organisation

A3Identify customer requirements for information and library services, archive services, and records management

A4Develop and contribute to strategy and policy for information and library services, archive services, and records management

A5Influence stakeholders

A6Develop and implement operational plans for your area of responsibility

A7Evaluate performance, value and impact of services

A8Plan improvements to strategies, services and functions

Area B – Governance and ethics

B1Ensure compliance with legal, regulatory, ethical and social requirements

B2Identify and apply information legislation, regulations and standards

B3Identify and apply professional codes of conduct and ethics

B4Comply with your employers’ values, policies and procedures

B5Advise on policies for information governance

Area C – Identifying, evaluating and acquiring content and collections

C1Determine customer and organisational requirements for content and collections

C2Establish what content is available to meet identified requirements and its sources of supply

C3Develop content and collection acquisition policies and strategies

C4Develop, negotiate, and manage supplier relationships

C5Acquire external information, materials, and services

C6Acquire internal content and records

C7Acquire archive materials and collections

C8Manage information quality

Area D – Managing knowledge

D1Develop policies and strategies for knowledge management

D2Diagnose knowledge needs, assets, use and flows

D3Support team and virtual working

D4Support collaboration, knowledge sharing and re-use

D5Facilitate knowledge capture

D6Enable the transfer of knowledge into information

D7Foster knowledge management culture, behaviours and skills

Area E – Managing content and collections

E1Determine policies and strategies for managing collections and content throughout their life cycle

E2Determine policies and strategies for the care of collections and repositories

E3Determine policies and strategies to ensure that items and content can be identified and found

E4Provide appropriate environments and systems for physical collections and repositories

E5Provide effective virtual environments for digital content and repositories

E6Preserve, conserve and manage collections and content

E7Apply standards that help people find content

E8Apply standards for the description and location of items

E9Manage content and collections for business continuity and information security

E10Assist customers to organise information effectively

Area F – Facilitating access to and use of content and collections

F1Develop strategy and policy for service provision

F2Develop service delivery plans

F3Promote resources and services

F4Educate customers to find and use information

F5Provide lending services

F6Provide enquiry and search services

F7Provide research and analysis services

F8Provide alerting services

F9Commission content or research

F10Present information in appropriate formats for customers

Area G – Facilitating lifelong learning Imported – origin

G1Develop and implement your organisation’s strategy for facilitating lifelong learning

G2Provide support to learners and groups of learners

G3Provide learners with support to use ILT LLUK E-learning NOS

G4Develop and adapt ILT materials to support learning LLUK E-learning NOS

G5Develop training sessions LLUK Learning and Development NOS L6

G6Enable learning through presentations LLUK Learning and Development NOS L10

G7Facilitate learning on-site using ILT LLUK E-learning NOS

Area H – Managing people to deliver services Imported – origin

H1Provide leadership for your team [MSC B5]

H2Provide leadership in your area of responsibility [MSC B6]

H3Allocate and monitor the progress and quality of work in your area of responsibility [MSC D6]

H4Allocate and check work in your team [MSC D5]

H5Develop productive working relationships with colleagues [MSC D1]

H6Develop organisational structures and systems to support volunteering [UKWH A3]

H7Manage your own resources and professional development [MSC A2]

H8Promote equality and diversity in your area of responsibility [MSC B11]

H9Work with others to improve customer service [ICS 39 / MSC F8]

H10Provide learning opportunities for colleagues [MSC D7]

Area A – Planning, developing and evaluating services

Standard A1 – Understand the external environment

What is the standard about?

Services need to be responsive to the world outside. This standard is about understanding the broader environment in which your organisation works, and the external drivers that influence its objectives and strategies. It includes monitoring developments and tends in the delivery of services that may impact on future service development.

Who is the standard for?

The standard is applicable to people in management roles with responsibility for developing policy and strategy in information and library services, archive services and records management. It is also relevant to people in practitioner and operational roles, so they understand something of the broader context in which their organisation functions.

In addition to the core values and behaviour, these behaviours underpin effective performance:

• You monitor the environment in which your organisation operates.

• You engage with relevant stakeholder and professional networks.

• You take note of significant changes in circumstances and signal these to colleagues.

• You identify issues and trends that could impact positively or negatively on current and future work.

• You adjust plans and activities to reflect external factors.

• You demonstrate a commitment to community participation in service design and delivery.

• You anticipate likely future scenarios based on a realistic analysis of trends and developments

Links with other standards and competency frameworks:

This standard has links with B2 – Map the environment in which your organisation operates in the NOS for Management and Leadership, developed by the Management Standards Centre. See www.management-standards.org or www.ukstandards.org

Standard A1 – Understand the external environment

To meet the standard, you must be able to:

1. Identify and prioritise the opportunities and threats to your organisation from the external environment.

2. Identify, evaluate and monitor trends and developments in the operational environment of your organisation.

3. Identify, evaluate and monitor trends and developments in information and library services, archive services and records management.

4. Relate those trends and development to your own services, and consider how they might affect them.

5. Explore and assess a range of future scenarios within the environment in which your organisation operates.

6. Consult with relevant colleagues and other stakeholders on market and trends and developments in order to inform and support decisions on future strategy.

7. Undertake community profiling using both qualitative and quantitative methods in order to inform the development of service strategies.

8. Ensure that your staffing profile, collections and services respond to and reflect the diversity of your customer base, including groups defined by age, disability, gender, race, religion and belief, sexual orientation and bilingual requirements.

9. Identify valid key indicators to evaluate the performance, value and impact of services and functions.

Standard A1 – Understand the external environment

To meet the standard, you must know and understand:

1. The relevant local national and international drivers in the environment in which your organisation operates.

2. The internal and external drivers for the engaging with your local community in the development of your services.

3. Current thinking in information and library services, archives services and records management.

4. Your actual and potential competitors (if applicable), including their activities and relative performance levels.

5. Your actual and potential partners, including their activities and relative performance levels.

6. How to analyse the factors in the external environment to identify those which may affect the future development of your services.

7. How to think about the future so that you can build scenarios and assess their implications.

8. Equalities legislation and public sector equality and diversity duties, as applicable to your organisation and its development.

9. The demographics of your customer base (and potential customer base), whether it is stable or changing.

Standard A2 – Understand the organisation

What is the standard about?

Services need to meet the requirements of the parent organisation and contribute to the achievement of its objectives. This standard is about understanding the culture, objectives and key processes of your organisation, and tracking these changes, so that strategies and services are fit for purpose.

Who is the standard for?

The standard is applicable to people in management roles with responsibility for developing policy and strategy in information and library services, archive services and records management. It is also relevant to people in practitioner and operational roles, so they understand their organisation’s objectives.

In addition to the core values and behaviour, these behaviours underpin effective performance:

1. You take an interest in developments in your organisation and seek to understand their significance to your role and the services you manage.

2. You identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to the provision of information and library services, archives services and records management.

3. You develop and maintain contact with stakeholders to enable discussion on the impact of organisational change on the services your deliver to customers.

4. You engage with other occupational and professional groups in your organisation (where these exist) to develop effective working relationships with them.

Links with other standards and competency frameworks:

This standard has links with B2 – Map the environment in which your organisation operates, B3 – Develop a strategic business plan for your organisation and F10 – Develop a customer focussed organisation in the NOS for Management and Leadership, developed by the Management Standards Centre. See www.management-standards.org or www.ukstandards.org

Standard A2 – Understand the organisation

To meet the standard, you must be able to:

1. Identify the key objectives of your organisation, both current and planned.

2. Identify, evaluate and monitor the key risks to your organisation and their implications for the services you provide.

3. Identify, evaluate and monitor trends and developments inside your organisation.

4. Identify and work creatively with your organisation’s politics and culture.

5. Undertake an assessment of take-up of / participation in the services and facilities your organisation offers.

6. Develop a clear understanding of how community profiling can support the achievement of organisational objectives.

7. Identify available resources to undertake community engagement and potential sources of funding to support this activity.

Standard A2 – Understand the organisation

To meet the standard, you must know and understand:

1. The relevant local, national and international drivers of the environment in which your organisation operates.

2. Your organisation’s strategic aims, policies and procedures.

3. Your organisation’s current and future objectives and business plan.

4. Your organisation’s performance against its targets / success factors.

5. Your organisation’s processes for developing policy and decision making.

6. Your organisation’s organisational structure and the key roles.

7. Your organisation’s culture and style of working.

8. How to analyse your organisation’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.

9. How information and library services, archive services or records management contribute to organisational goals (if these are a function within a larger organisation).

10. How engaging with local communities can potentially support the achievement of organisational objectives.

11. Public sector equality and diversity duties, as applicable to your organisation.

Standard A3 – Identify customer requirements for information and library services, archive services and records management functions

What is the standard about?

Services need to meet the requirements of the parent organisation and contribute to the achievement of its objectives. This standard is about understanding the culture, objectives and key processes of your organisation, and tracking these changes, so that strategies and services are fit for purpose.

Who is the standard for?

The standard is applicable to people in management and practitioner roles with responsibility for planning and developing information and library services, archive services and records management functions. It is also relevant to people in practitioner and operational roles who are engaged in the delivery of services to customers.

In addition to the core values and behaviour, these behaviours underpin effective performance:

1. You take note of and communicate changing customer needs as you identify them.

2. You consider the likely needs of potential customers, especially those from diverse, under-represented and hard-to-reach groups, in addition to those of existing customers.

3. You recognise that customers may not express their needs clearly, through lack of awareness of the capability of services or for other reasons.

4. You are aware of the potential barriers to communities and individuals in taking-up / participating in the services you provide.

5. You respect and value diversity.

Links with other standards and competency frameworks:

This standard has links with F7 – Support customer service improvements and F8 – Work with others to improve customer service in the NOS for Management and Leadership, developed by the Management Standards Centre. See www.management-standards.org or www.ukstandards.org

Standard A3 – Identify customer requirements for information and library services, archive services and records management functions

To meet the standard, you must be able to:

1. Identify customers and potential customers.

2. Develop processes, appropriate to your service and its size, for monitoring the requirements of current and potential customers and usage of current services.

3. Identify the ways in which the physical environment, organisational policies and procedures can impact upon people with physical, sensory, learning or other disabilities to deter or prevent them from accessing services and facilities.

4. Employ quantitative and qualitative market research techniques appropriately to assess the needs of potential and current customers.

5. Identify and establish contact with individuals/groups within local communities who can benefit from and/or contribute to the services you provide.

6. Undertake consultation using appropriate methods and feedback analyse the results to determine future service developments.

7. Analyse results of market research in the external environment to determine potential requirements.

8. Identify appropriate agencies or specialists to undertake market research, if appropriate.

9. Ensure that data and information gathered as part of market research is used appropriately and ethically.

10. Prepare clear and relevant briefs for market research projects.

Standard A3 – Identify customer requirements for information and library services, archive services and records management functions

To meet the standard, you must know and understand:

1. The current and potential customers of your services, including those identified by age, disability, gender, race, religion and belief, sexual orientation and the language requirements of bilingual communities.

2. The context in which they need information and library services, archive service or records management systems.

3. What their objectives and priorities are, and the differential impact of policies on different customer groups

4. The key businesses processes and workflows of your organisation.

5. The key activities and concerns of your current and potential customers.

6. The range of quantitative and qualitative market research and consultation techniques available, and when it is appropriate to use them.

7. How information and library services, archive service or records management systems can benefit organisations and individuals.

8. The potential contribution of community participation work to wider social policy agendas both regionally and nationally.

Standard A4 – Develop and contribute to strategy and policy for information and library services, archives services and records management

What is the standard about?

Having understood the world about you, your organisation and your customers the next stage is to develop a strategy to meet the requirements. This standard is about developing and contributing to the development of strategies and policies that ensure that services are aligned with your organisation’s objectives, stakeholder expectations and customer requirements. If your service unit is part of a larger organisation then you need to ensure that your perspective is taken account of in other organisational strategies.

Who is the standard for?

The standard is applicable to people in management roles with responsibility for establishing strategy and policy. It is also relevant to people in practitioner and operational roles who may contribute to the process on the basis of their experience of service delivery and contact with customers.

In addition to the core values and behaviour, these behaviours underpin effective performance:

1. You are creative and innovative in the development of strategy and policy.

2. You exploit external experience to apply appropriate and current practice in the delivery if information and library services, archives services and records management functions.

3. You contribute practical insights and experience to strategy and policy development.

4. You address equality and diversity issues at a strategic level, ensuring that measures to make services accessible and inclusive are included in core business plans and that the necessary resources are available.

Links with other standards and competency frameworks:

This standard has links with B3 – Develop a strategic business plan for your organisation and F9 – Build your organisation’s understanding of its market and customers in the NOS for Management and Leadership, developed by the Management Standards Centre. See www.management-standards.org or www.ukstandards.org

Standard A4 – Develop and contribute to strategy and policy for information and library services, archives services and records management

To meet the standard, you must be able to:

1. Identify how the services and functions currently in place to help your organisation meet its objectives and customer needs.

2. Identify and prioritise customer needs in terms of value and impact to your organisation as well as the feasibility of meeting them.

3. Identify current and new information service requirements.

4. Identify new opportunities for services and functions as the organisation’s objectives change.

5. Identify and prioritise the strengths and weaknesses of services and functions and in terms of their benefit to your organisation.

6. Identify risks to the services and functions you manage, their severity and how these risks can be managed.

7. Create a vision for the services for which you are responsible.

8. Identify relevant resources and developments in the wider world that should influence the activity you manage.

9. Build alliances with partners to support the delivery of services.

10. Develop (or contribute to) an information strategy for your organisation which is aligned with business goals, legislative requirements, strategic planning and operational practices and which clarifies service and functional priorities.

11. Align this strategy to other organisational strategies eg business strategy, operational/delivery strategy, skills development, IT systems strategy.

12. Propose delivery options, cost them and evaluate their likely effectiveness.

Standard A4 – Develop and contribute to strategy and policy for information and library services, archives services and records management

To meet the standard, you must know and understand:

1. How information and library services, archives services and records management services deliver value to organisations and the diverse range of customers (and potential customers).

2. Good practice in information and library services, archives services and records management.

3. The concepts of product and service life cycles, specifically those that relate to information and records.

4. Existing and emerging information management theories, concepts, processes and tools.

5. The information requirements of different communities, and how to balance or prioritise between them.

6. How to determine the information needs of your organisation and its work processes.

Standard A5 – Influence stakeholders

What is the standard about?

Customers are not the only people whose requirements need to be considered. There are other individuals, groups and organisations (inside and outside of your organisation) who have an interest in the services you provide. This standard is about identifying and understanding the perspective of stakeholders and engaging with them to develop positive and mutually beneficial working relationships.

Who is the standard for?

The standard is applicable to people in management roles with responsibility for developing strategy. It is also relevant to people in practitioner and operational roles who will have contact with stakeholders and have the opportunity to influence them.

In addition to the core values and behaviour, these behaviours underpin effective performance:

1. You recognise the importance of building support with key individuals, groups and organisations.

2. You seek ideas from stakeholders for service developments.

3. You recognise that not all stakeholders have equal importance and can prioritise whilst having due regard to the legal requirements to provide equitable services to groups identified by age, disability, gender, race, religion and belief, sexual orientation and (in Wales) the requirement for bilingual services.

4. You recognise the need to keep all stakeholders informed at an appropriate level about plans and proposed changes to services.

5. You recognise that customers have choices and that you may have competitors for the services you provide.

6. Your value partnership working in developing and delivering services.

Links with other standards and competency frameworks:

This standard has links with B2 – Map the environment in which your organisation operates in the NOS for Management and Leadership, developed by the Management Standards Centre. See www.management-standards.org or www.ukstandards.org

Standard A5 – Influence stakeholders

To meet the standard, you must be able to:

1. Identify the key stakeholders, both internal and external, who influence the development of the services and functions you provide.

2. Identify potential competitors and partners, both internal and external.

3. Identify organisations whose expertise may be available to assist in developing services to meet the requirements of customer groups, e.g. disabled people’s organisations, local access groups, black and minority ethnic community groups or community archives groups.

4. Maintain effective working relationships with stakeholders.

5. Communicate with stakeholders using appropriate language, reflecting their concerns and avoiding the use of unnecessary technical language or jargon.

6. Present the needs of customer groups and individuals, including the particular access requirements of disabled people, for services and functions to decision-makers.

7. Influence attitudes and decisions relating to services and functions.

8. Secure champions for particular services and functions.

9. Develop and present convincing arguments on behalf of the principles underlying the services and functions you provide.

10. Build alliances with stakeholders and partners to help you establish services.

Standard A5 – Influence stakeholders

To meet the standard, you must know and understand:

1. The profile of stakeholders and their relative influence.

2. The roles of others outside your organisation who may have an impact on the direction of the services and functions you provide.

3. The politics and culture of your organisation, and the sector in which it operates.

4. The objectives and priorities of your key stakeholders, and what they perceive as benefits and risks.

5. The needs and expectations of your key stakeholders.

6. The perceptions of stakeholders of the services and functions you provide.

7. The needs of customers that require bringing to the attention of key stakeholders.

8. The range of services and functions you provide.

9. The range of services and functions that you could provide.

10. How to communicate with different types of stakeholders.

Standard A6 Develop and implement operational plans for your area of responsibility [MSC B1]

Unit summary

What is the unit about?

Every organisation should have an overall strategic business plan and each identified area of responsibility should also have an operational plan that will contribute to achieving the objectives set out in the strategic business plan. The ‘area of responsibility’ may be, for example, a branch or department or functional area or an operating site within an organisation.

Who is the unit for?

The unit is recommended for middle managers.


Date: 2015-12-24; view: 74


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