Home Random Page


CATEGORIES:

BiologyChemistryConstructionCultureEcologyEconomyElectronicsFinanceGeographyHistoryInformaticsLawMathematicsMechanicsMedicineOtherPedagogyPhilosophyPhysicsPolicyPsychologySociologySportTourism






TRANSLATION OF ENGLISH VERBALS AND VERBAL CONSTRUCTIONS/COMPLEXES

Present-day English abounds in asyndetic noun clusters which are very often used in newspaper and scientific matter/texts. They are word-groups consisting of two, three or more nouns (functionally equivalent to word-groups) like yarn production, yam production figures; the House of Commons debate; mother and child care. New Deal and Great Society programs.'

Irrespective of the number of components in these clusters or their structure, they are always in subordinate relation to each other, i.e., they function as adjunct (attributive component) and head (nucleus). The former occupies the left-hand (initial) position and the latter -the right-hand (closing) position in the cluster. The subordinate relation between the parts of the binary asyndetic substantival cluster can be graphically presented as follows: yarn -> production, the House of Commons -> debate, mother and child -> care, cotton yam -> production, New Deal and Great Society -> programs.

In many such and the like noun clusters the head components may have a compound noun or a word-group structure too: Sahara -> oilwells, US - open tennis champions, The placement of head may be reverse: Stormont<r- a Social Democratic and Labour Party MP. Many asyndetic noun clusters have often extended adjuncts and extended/expanded heads as in examples Upper Clyde Shipbuilders -> shop stewards; Noise Advisory Council -> working group representative; the Suez Canal Zone base -> agreement negotiations.

The semantic interrelation between the componental parts in asyndetic noun clusters may often be rather complicated.

 

TRANSLATION OF ENGLISH VERBALS AND VERBAL CONSTRUCTIONS/COMPLEXES

Common English and Ukrainian non-finite forms of the verb, i.e., the infinitive and both participles, are characterized by identical functions in the sentence. Some of their lexico-grammatical meanings, however, are considerably broader in English than in Ukrainian and include the combined tense and aspect or tense, aspect and voice forms of the infinitive as well as of the present participle derived respectively from the intransitive and from transitive verbs (cf. to live - to be living, to have lived; but: to do - to be done, to be doing; doing - being done, having been done, etc.)

To render faithfully some of these lexico-grammatical meanings (semes) of English verbal paradigms into Ukrainian is not always possible. An exception make the simple paradigms, which usually have semantic and structural equivalents in both languages. For

example:

English Ukrainian
to ask to be asked -

,

working (Participle I) - , ; having worked (Perfect Participle) - , .

Translation of verbals depends not only on their structural, i.e., paradigmatic forms but also on their nature. Thus, a special approach is needed to render in Ukrainian the complexity of meanings contained by some paradigms of the English gerund (or to render the meanings of the Ukrainian diyepryslivnyk in English).



Consequently, the ways of rendering the meanings of verbals are predetermined by some factors which include a) the structural form of the verbal and b) the function of the verbal in the sentence,


where it may be either a single part of the sentence or a component of an extended part of the sentence.

Despite the differences in their morphological nature and lexical meaning, some verbals may perform the same functions in English sentences and in their corresponding Ukrainian syntaxemes. Hence, it is expedient to contrast the functions and meanings of English and Ukrainian verbals in the corresponding sentences of these two languages.


Date: 2014-12-29; view: 167


<== previous page | next page ==>
SUGGESTED TOPICS FOR SELF-TESTING AND CLASS DISCUSSION | WAYS OF RENDERING THE LEXICO-GRAMMATICAL MEANINGS AND FUNCTIONS OF THE ENGLISH INFINITIVE
doclecture.net - lectures - 2014-2017 year. Copyright infringement or personal data (0.006 sec.)