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Procedures and Systems

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Process Process

People

Within the world of People, if you have more A than B answers, you are more interested in caring for people than in influencing them. You should therefore be looking for a career in the medical, welfare or education fields: for example, doctor, dentist, psychiatrist, health visitor, radiographer, social worker, speech-therapist, teacher or lecturer. But if you have scored more B than A answers, you are more likely to feel at home in a job involving control, commerce or management: for example, the armed forces, police, prison officer, security guard, sales representative, marketing manager, property developer, advertising executive or market researcher.

Procedures and Systems

If your original score places you in the world of Procedures and Systems, more A than B answers points to a career in administrative, legal or clerical work: for example, Civil Servant, office manager, personnel manager, company secretary, solicitor, professional secretary, librarian, archivist, book researcher or records officer. If you have more B than A answers, the chances are your interest in Procedures and Systems will be better catered for in finance and data processing. Suitable careers include: accountancy, banking, valuing, economics, computer programming and systems analysis.

Communications and the Arts

In the world of Communications and the Arts, a higher A than B score should point you towards the media, literature or languages. Occupations include: journalist, radio or television researcher, advertising copy writer, translator or public relations officer.

A higher B than A score, on the other hand, indicates that you are more suited to design and the visual arts. Careers include: graphic designer, cartographer, architect, interior designer, window dresser, theatrical designer, fashion designer or photographer.

Science and Engineering

The main division in this area is between research and practice. More As suggest research, more B's suggest practice. Since most careers in this world have opportunities for both research and applied work, it is not possible to make specific suggestions to individuals on the basis of their A and B responses. Careers include: biologist, physicist, chemist, mechanical and civil engineer.

 

Unit 2 First working experience

Warm-up

· Do you have a job? Part- / full-time? What for do you do it: to improve your professional skills or to make money?

8. Do you remember your first working experience?

9. Read the interview with a woman called Liz about her first job, teaching in Tanzania.



My first job

I = Interviewer, L= Liz

IWhat was your first job, Liz?

L Oh, I can remember it very well. I’d just graduated and I’d just got married – two important things – and my husband got a teaching job in Tanzania. And we went out there together and my idea was ... what I hoped to do was to get a job shortly after getting there. And I didn’t really know what kind of job it would be.

I So you were just taking pot luck, really?

L Well, what happened was I thought I’d take some time to settle us in to this small town on the coast of Tanzania, north of Dar es Salaam, a town called Tanga, and I thought I’d settle us in – wherever we were going to live, I – we didn’t know. But on the very first day we were there, somebody came running up to me, literally in the street, and said ‘We hear you’re – you’re a graduate, and the local junior school’s going to close down. Please, do you think you could be the teacher?’

I The only teacher?

L No, one of two. I was to teach the six to thirteen year-olds, all nationalities, and there was also a class of five and six year-olds, all nationalities, in this small, local school. It was called Nuguvumali School. It was a very small school just outside, through the banana plantation on the hill outside of Tanga.

IBut you had no experience of teaching at all?

L No. I look back now, now that I am a teacher- because I ultimately became a teacher - I look back with horror and think, ‘The only way that I think that I coped was because of … I was so ignorant, I didn’t know any better’. And every day I took the job. I felt as if I was doing a really good deed. Every day we drove out to this small school, just a little wooden school – it had a veranda all round – and the kind of thing that happened was … because it was out in the bush, there was a lot of snakes. And we had something that was very important with these children. It was a snake drill. It was important to me too, I was terrified of snakes. Unfortunately, the children weren’t frightened of snakes, so whenever the cry went up ‘A snake!’, instead of running in the opposite direction, the children would all run straight towards the snake. And I had the job of getting in between the children and the snake, and trying to say ‘No, no!’ you know, ‘Back you go – Remember the snake drill!’ and they’d cheer and cheer until they came along and chopped the snake’s head off, and the snake would go on wriggling. And then the children would cheer, and only after the final wriggle could we go back and start classes again.

I So the kids actually had a knife or something on them, did they?

L Well, the caretaker had a knife. It was not a knife, something called a panga. It’s a big African knife that they cut the grass with and the caretaker would run up with this panga and go ‘Chop! – snake finished’.

I And did you have any discipline problems with these kids?

L Well, no. The thing was, when I took over the job, I was told by this very strict teacher that in Tanzania you had to punish the children very firmly. And the way you did that was you slapped them on the leg. And I was, I was twenty remember, yeah twenty years old, and I thought ‘You slap them on the leg’, and she gave me a list of things where they were slapped on the leg. If they forgot a library book – they had a little library. And one day a little girl forgot a library book, and I thought ‘Oh dear! I’m supposed to slap her on the leg!’ And I thought ‘I can’t do that’. So I didn’t, and in fact I never really had discipline problems.

It was quite funny. I was supposed to teach them everything, I mean it was a junior school, and one of the things I was supposed to teach them was geography, and I knew nothing about geography, but as part of my university course, I’d done something about Sweden, and Swedish – mainly about the language, but as part of the course for some reason we’d done something on Swedish geography. So here I was in Africa – and I thought ‘I have to teach them geography, I don’t know any geography’ – there were no books. So I taught them about Sweden. And funnily enough of all the things I taught I think that was the most successful. They were fascinated in a country with snow, and a country where it didn’t always get light at six o’clock, and it didn’t always get dark at six o’clock, and I think that was one of my main successes. Every day I went in, and they’d say ‘Tell us some more about Sweden!’ and I didn’t have a lot to tell, really. But I don’t know if I did anything else very well, but I was very good in telling them about Sweden …

Comprehension check

10. Answer the following questions:

a. What did Liz hope to do at first in Tanzania? “what I hoped to do was to get a job shortly after getting there

b. Did she manage to do this? Why / why not? “But on the very first day we were there, somebody came running up to me, literally in the street, and said ‘We hear you’re – you’re a graduate, and the local junior school’s going to close down. Please, do you think you could be the teacher?’

 

c. What sort of school did she teach at? “I was to teach the six to thirteen year-olds, all nationalities, and there was also a class of five and six year-olds, all nationalities, in this small, local school. It was called Nuguvumali School. It was a very small school just outside, through the banana plantation on the hill outside of Tanga.

d. What happened when a snake appeared? “And I had the job of getting in between the children and the snake, and trying to say ‘No, no!’ you know, ‘Back you go – Remember the snake drill!’ and they’d cheer and cheer until they came along and chopped the snake’s head off, and the snake would go on wriggling. And then the children would cheer, and only after the final wriggle could we go back and start classes again.

e. What was Liz’s attitude to problems of discipline? “and she gave me a list of things where they were slapped on the leg. If they forgot a library book – they had a little library. And one day a little girl forgot a library book, and I thought ‘Oh dear! I’m supposed to slap her on the leg!’ And I thought ‘I can’t do that’. So I didn’t, and in fact I never really had discipline problems.

f. Why did she teach the children about the geography of Sweden? “I knew nothing about geography, but as part of my university course, I’d done something about Sweden, and Swedish – mainly about the language, but as part of the course for some reason we’d done something on Swedish geography.


Date: 2016-01-05; view: 314


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