Home Random Page


CATEGORIES:

BiologyChemistryConstructionCultureEcologyEconomyElectronicsFinanceGeographyHistoryInformaticsLawMathematicsMechanicsMedicineOtherPedagogyPhilosophyPhysicsPolicyPsychologySociologySportTourism






You should also call the claims department of your insurance company as soon as possible.

A: Yes. Depending on the circumstances, a single event may be tried in both courts. This is not considered double jeopardy.

A: In most states, juries are instructed that merely being present at the scene of a crime, even with guilty knowledge that a crime is being committed, isn't enough to convict a person of a crime. But there are principles of criminal liability that apply to people other than the actual perpetrator of a crime. For example, under federal law there is a crime called "misprision" of a felony, which applies to a person who has actual knowledge of the commission of a felony and doesn't report it to the authorities.

A: While the precise definition can vary from state to state, a person commits the crime of "criminal trespass" when she enters or remains on another's property without the owner's consent. You may have a defense against criminal trespass if the property was open to the public, or your conduct didn't substantially interfere with the owner's use of the property, or you immediately left the premises when requested.

A: Fleeing or eluding police occurs when a police officer gives you a visual or audible signal to stop, whether by hand, voice, emergency light or siren, and you don't obey.

It's unlawful for a person who's either driving or in a vehicle, or not to disobey an officer's order to stop, by fleeing on foot or by any other means.

Exercise 2. The criminal justice process typically begins when a police officer places a person under arrest. Discuss the following questions concerning the arrest:

1. When is a person considered to be arrested?

2. Is the use of physical restraint or handcuffs always necessary? Give the examples.

3. In which of the following circumstances can a police officer arrest a person?

− The police officer personally observes a crime.

− The police officer has a reasonable belief, based on facts and circumstances, that a person has committed or is about to commit a crime.

− The police officer suspects but is not sure that a person has committed or is about to commit a crime.

− A police officer receives a report of an armed robbery that has just occurred at a liquor store, then sees a man who matches the suspect's exact description running down the street near the store.

− An arrest warrant has been issued.

− The police officer has a reasonable belief, based on facts and circumstances, that a person has committed or is about to commit a crime, but he hasn't obtained a valid warrant to arrest this person.


Date: 2015-01-02; view: 291


<== previous page | next page ==>
Criminal punishment may include execution, loss of liberty, government supervision (parole or probation), or fines. | TYPES OF TOURISM
doclecture.net - lectures - 2014-2017 year. Copyright infringement or personal data (0.011 sec.)